Meyer I. Grinberg’s Store

Meyer I. Grinberg sold house furnishings and electrical supplies in his popular store, which had locations in downtown Pittsburgh (where the PNC building is now going up) and in Braddock as well.

Meyer Grinberg in front of his store (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Meyer Grinberg in front of his store (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Truck Advertising Meyer Grinberg's Store, 1925 (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Truck Advertising Meyer Grinberg’s Store, 1925 (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Undated picture of the interior of Meyer Grinberg's store

Undated picture of the interior of Meyer Grinberg’s store (source: Grinberg family donation to Heinz History Center)

Ralph Grinberg fixing up a display, 1940

Ralph Grinberg fixing up a display, 1940 (source: Grinberg family donation to Heinz History Center)

Remodeling the store, March 1940

Remodeling the store, March 1940 (source: Grinberg family donation to Heinz History Center)

The Great Flood

The Great Flood of March 21, 1936 was the worst flood in Pittsburgh’s history.  During the prolonged power outage, the Grinberg family made oil lamps!

Allen Grinberg and family after great flood of 1936 (source: Allen Grinberg via Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Allen, Meyer, Tiby, Rhoda, and Ralph Grinberg after the Great Flood of 1936 (source: Allen Grinberg via Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Ralph, Meyer, and Bernard Grinberg after the Great Flood (source: Grinberg family donations to the Heinz History Center)

Ralph, Meyer, and Bernard Grinberg after the Great Flood (source: Grinberg family donations to the Heinz History Center)

Great Flood of 1936 (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Meyer & Tiby Grinberg after the Great Flood of 1936 (source: Allen Grinberg via the Homestead Exhibit Photographs)

Front page of The Pittsburgh Press, 3/20/1936.

Here is the paper they are holding, The Pittsburgh Press from 3/20/1936.  You can read it here! According to the archivists at the Heinz History Center, people call several times a week offering to donate copies of the newspaper covering this event.

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