Fortieth Anniversary Newspaper Articles

In both cases the articles seem to be referring to the 20th anniversary of the synagogue building, and not the 40th anniversary of the congregation.  Also note that both articles are largely the same.  Who plagiarized whom?!


 

The Messenger, 1/30/1934, p.8

The Messenger, 1/30/1934, p.8

In my research so far this is the first time I’ve found a congregation event listed in the Society section of Homestead’s newspaper.  

Dinner Marks 20th Anniversary Of Rodef Shalom Synagogue

Probably the most brilliant affair ever given in Rodef Shalom Synagogue was the anniversary dinner Sunday at 6:30 o’clock when more than two hundred persons attended. The affair was arranged to mark the twentieth anniversary of the erection of the Temple as well as the fortieth anniversary of the organization of the congregation in this district and it was gratifying indeed that some persons could be present who were instrumental in erecting the first place of worship.

The spacious dining room where the dinner was served was beautifully decorated with American and Jewish flags and bunting of the national colors. Candelabras with tall lighted tapers in the vivid hues, also a large beautifully decorated cake and adored with twenty blue and white tapers, the Synagogues (sic) colors signifying purity and truth, which was donated by Mrs. M. Fischman were the table decorations. Unique favors were at each place.

Following the sumptuous dinner Max Rubin chairman of the affair and who with his efficient committee had worked arduously to make this event the huge success that it was and who must have felt well repaid for his efforts, warmly greeted the guests and presented the toast master of the evening, Dr. M. H. Moss. Dr. Moss who was secretary during the erection of the edifice and who served as president of the congregation for some time and who also is in his element as spokesman at an elaborate affair such as Sunday evening’s proved to be, extended a cordial welcome to all present and presented three small boys who also extended (sic) greetings, the first being in Hebrew by Carl Fischman, the next in Jewish by Marvin Hadburg, last in English by Marvin Rubin. Homestead’s violinist, she can well be termed although now residing in the city, Jeannette Fischel Egerman and the well known accompanist, Roy Magram, were presented and played an old Hebrew ody (sic) “A Letter to Mother,” “Hora Staccato” by Heisetz 1 (sic) and “Schon (sic) Roamarin” by Keisler 2 (sic).

Too much credit cannot be given to the members who started with a mere handfull (sic) people, as it were to erect a beautiful temple such as they have today for worship to God, said A. Morris Pinkas, head of the congregation. Rabbi Pinkas’ talk was interspersed with humor and receive favorable comment from all present. M.D. Weis, the present president of the congregation and who probably knows the up’s and down’s of building an edifice as well as any person who was present, gave a splendid talk. The vocalist of the evening was Mrs. Harry Schoor who pleasingly entertained by singing a group of folk songs accompanied by Mr. Magram.

The history of the Synagogue was written by I. Grossman and read by his son, W. Harold Grossman was most interesting. The history began at the very beginning telling how a few people met at the home of Sam Markowitz, Ammon street, forty years ago, to plan and organize a place of worship. Such names as Seigelman, Lasudsky, I.S. Grossman, Bob Hepps and others who were familiarly known, many of whom have passed beyond, were mentioned.

Mrs. Max Rubin president of the Ladies Aid Society was presented and after congratulatory remarks told of how she was trying to establish a community centre for the youth of Homestead. Max Egerman of the city, who by the way is a man of genius, was present at the dinner and what caused a great deal of humor was when Dr. Moss told how he (Mr. Egerman) had helped the building committee in many ways and that he had been waiting for twenty years for such an occasion to publicly thank him for his kindly advice. An original poem appropriate to the occasion was written and read by Mrs. Sam Gross.

Last but not least was the guest speaker of the evening, Rabbi Henry Goldberg of New Kensington. After extending his congratulations to all concerned, he talked on “Judisam” (sic), what it has meant to the world, etc. For more than an hour the Rabbi, who is a fluent talker, electrified the audience with his flow of oratory and his listeners were loath when it was completed. The splendid program was concluded with Mrs. Schoor again singing a group of songs with Mr. Magram at the piano.

members of the committee who assisted Mr. Rubin in perfecting the arrangements were Harry Jacobson, vice-chairman, Max Lazar, B. Mermelstein, Louis Jackson, Sam Newman, I. Glick, I. Kramer and Louis Schwartz. Mr. Markowitz who artistically decorated the room for the anniversary dinner, was highly commended and the youth of the Synagogue who so ably assisted were Ed Mermelstein, Buddy Jacobson and Master Gross. The ladies who prepared the dinner included Mrs. Harry Jacobson, Mrs. M. Fischman, Mrs.H.S. Jaobson, Mrs. H.S. Schwartz, Mrs. M.S. Fogel, Mrs. Max Rubin, Mrs. L. Jackson, Mrs. Harry Fedman, Mrs. I Burechson and Mrs. Lefkowitz.

The cake which decorated the table also ice cream and etc. were taken yesterday to the Jewish Home For Babies, this nice idea being conceived by the ladies who were in charge.


The Jewish Criterion, 2/2/1934, p. 22

The Jewish Criterion, 2/2/1934, p. 22

Does the article sound familiar to you?  It’s a shorter version of the one in the Homestead newspaper (though it mentions a speech the other does not).

Homestead Synagogue Observes Twentieth Anniversary

Probably the most brilliant affair ever given in Rodef Shalom Synagogue of Homestead was the anniversary dinner last Sunday, when more than two hundred persons attended. The affair was arranged to mark the twentieth anniversary of the erection of the Temple, as well as the fortieth anniversary of the organization of the congregation in Homestead, which from a mere handful of members has grown until they now have a beautiful temple in which to worship.  It was gratifying to note that among those present were some who were instrumental in erecting Homestead’s first Jewish place of worship.

The spacious dining room of the Synagogue was beautifully decorated with American and Jewish flags and bunting in national colors. Candelabra and an elaborate attractive cake which was contributed by Mrs. M. Fischman were the table decorations.  Following a sumptuous dinner Mr. Max Rubin, chairman of the affair, greeted the guests and presented the toast master of the evening, Dr. M. H. Moss, who has served the congregation as president for some time.  His talk was followed by greetings in Hebrew by three small boys, Marvin Habburg (sic), Marvin Ruben and Carl Fischman, after which Jeannette Fischel Egerman, accomplished violinist, accompanied by Roy Magram, presented several delightful selections.  Mrs. Samuel Schor, vocalist of the evening, was also accompanied by Mr. Magram in a group of lovely folk songs.

Rabbi A. Morris Pinkas, rabbi of Rodef Shalom Synagogue, and Mr. M.D. Weis, president, both delivered splendid and eloquent addresses and a history of the Synagogue, written by I. Grossman, Esq., was read by his son, W. Harold Grossman, Esq.   Mrs. Max Rubin, president of the Ladies Aid Society of Homestead, spoke on the work of her organization and its connection with the Synagogue, and following this talk Mrs. Samuel Gross read a poem, appropriate to the occasion, which she had written.  Samuel Glick, president of the Homestead Y.M.H.A., also had some very interesting messages for those who had gathered together, and Rabbi Henry Goldberger of New Kensington, guest speaker of the evening, spoke on “Judaism and Its Significance,” receiving great acclaim.

Those active on the committee who worked so hard for the success of the this momentous event with Mr. Ruben were Harry Jacobson, Max Lazar, B. Mermelstein, Louis Jackson, Sam Newman, I. Glick, J. Burechson, I. Kramer and Louis Schwartz. Mr. Markowitz deserves much credit for his beautiful work on the decorations, and the following ladies are to be thanked for preparing the delicious dinner:  Mesdames Harry Jacobson, S. Fischman, H.S. Jaobson, H.S. Schwartz, M.S. Fogel,  L. Jackson, Harry Fedman, J. Burechson and I. Lefkowitz.


  1. Watch Jascha Heifetz, one of the most famous Russian-Jewish violinists ever, play it here  

  2. Listen to Fritz Kreisler, a famous Viennese violinist (born Jewish, but baptized at 12), play Schön Rosmarin here  

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