Jews in the News, 1920

Aftermath of the Great War

  • 2/17:  “The Young Men’s Hebrew Association of Homestead will celebrate Washington’s birthday by publicly dedicating their War Memorial Tablet with exercises at the Carnegie Library, Homestead.  The public is most cordially invited to be present…”  The article lays out the program, including Major E. Lowry Humes, United States District Attorney for the Western District, and Rev. Dr. Samuel H. Goldenson, Rabbi of that other Rodef Shalom.
  • 2/23:  “The dedicating of a war tablet by last evening at Carnegie music hall, attracted a large audience of the parents and friends of the soldiers who took part in the World war…The stage was handsomely decorated with flags and two large busts of George Washington…Attorney Grossman was chairman” and was joined on stage by Joseph Lasdusky and other prominent men.  “The exercises opened with singing of ‘America,’ after which Dr. Goldenson  offered prayer, and Mrs. Libbie Goldston, of Eighth avenue, who had over a score of descendants in the World war, unveiled the beautiful bronze tablet…” The full article listed the whole honor roll.
  • 2/26: “Owing to an error, a very important part of last Sunday evening’s program of the Y.M.H.A. at the Carnegie Library was omitted.  The War Tablet was unveiled by Mrs. Libbi Goldston who probably holds the greatest war record in Pennsylvania.  She is the mother of seven living children, 69 grandchildren, 87 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.  She had ten grandchildren in the British Army and ten grand and great-grandchildren in the American Army and Navy.  Of these, a number received commissions and one, a Mr. Myers, of Steubenville, was awarded a medal by Secretary Daniels.  Miss Florence Goldston accompanied by Miss Ruth Grinberg rendered two vocal solos.  Violin and piano music was furnished by Messrs. Schwartz and Levin.”
  • 10/21/1920

    10/21/1920

    9/21:  Starting in early 1920, if not earlier, concerns about rising consumer prices began to spread nationwide.  Indeed, the Consumer Price Index noted a 23.7% increase in price from June 1919-June 1920.  There was even a whole Congressional hearing on the “Increased Price of Shoes.”  The Homestead paper suggested that the merchants themselves — “gougers and gamblers” — were to blame for “prices [which] have certainly not been fair in Homestead.  It is therefore with relief that we welcome the visits of Mr. Mulligan of the Fair Price Commission of Allegheny county.”  I cannot find out much about this organization, but groups like it appeared to exist nationwide since at least late 1919, sanctioned by state and federal governments. “Twenty-five merchants gathered at the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce last evening last evening” to hear this Mr. Mulligan “[give] out the mark up prices, that is the amount permitted a merchant to mark up the article over the cost price…Shoe prices were given Mr. Goldston and Mr. Lasdusky was given prices on ladies’ ready-to-wear.” (Other men got clothing and grocery prices.)  “Merchants in the various lines can secure these prices by consulting with the men named above.”  (At this point, though, the CPI says prices were already decreasing — they went down 15.8% from June 1920-June 1921.)  10/15:  “Homestead Merchants Far From Profiteers, Declares The Fair Price Investigator Of Country,” blared a large headline.  The investigator “claims that the store he has investigated, in many cases, were below the mark up percentage allowed by the Lever Act.”  Apparently only 10 counties in PA recognized this act as constitutional, and luckily (?) Allegheny was one.  Ads from Ben Little and Half Bros. during October ensured customers that their prices were fair.

  • 10/4:  “Harry D. Margolis and his brother Lewis of H.L. Little‘s Shoe store have gone to New Mexico. Harry will return immediately while his brother is going to stay for his health, he being gassed in France.”  10/12:  “Harry D. Margolis, of H.L. Little’s shoe store has just returned from New Mexico, where he spent his vacation.”
  • 11/5:  “Merchants To Aid Soldiers in Armistice Day Celebration,” read the headline.  Chairman Lasdusky of the Mercantile committee of the Chamber of Commerce appointed a committee to work with the local Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion groups.

Integration

  • From 1/19-1/21 the paper promoted bachelors to whom the Homestead ladies could propose during Leap Year.  A few members of the Jewish community came up!
    • 1/9: “Ben Little, who keeps one of the best shoe stores on 8th avenue, is able to keep the family well shod and has no objection to talk with the women about shoes, but be careful how you approach him on the marriage question or he might shoo you out.” “Eddie Lowenstein can be seen at Half. Bros. store at any time during business hours. The way to start up a conversation with him is to pretend you wish to buy some furniture. During the conversation inadvertently display a roll to show that you could buy the store if you wanted to, then lead up to the subject of matrimony.”
    • 1/10: “Marion Steinberger. Was over in France fighting for his country, but even a French girl failed to catch him. He can be seen at any time at Half Bros. store and any girl with a certificate from a domestic science school could easily lasso him, for he is fond of good things to eat. But he hates to see a K.P. coming around.”
    • 1/14: “But stay away from Marion Steinberger of Half Bros. Marion says he is far too young to be considered among bachlors. He says the world, as it were so to speak, not to mention girls, is still before him, and he knows he will be able to find a girl some day himself, and if not he will wait until next Leap Year, please.”
  • 1/14:  B. Hepps was re-elected to the Board of Directors of the Homestead Savings Bank and Trust Company, and B. Friedlander to the First National Bank of Munhall.
  • 1/17:  With women soon to get the vote, the local Chamber of Commerce discussed whether women could join their body.  The paper published a range of opinions from local businessmen.  Ralph Lasday said, “I am heartily in favor of admitting women to membership.”
  • 2/2:  Amongst the patronesses for the town’s upcoming Charity Ball at Elk’s Temple were Mrs. A.S. Hepps and Mrs. I. Lincoff.  Thanks were extended to Half Bros. for their donation of tickets.  Given the strike that had recently ended and the rapidly rising cost of living, it’s not surprising that a large-scale fundraising effort was being organized at this time.
  • 2/5:  Edward Haupt was elected secretary and treasurer of the Scoutmasters Association of the Homestead district the previous evening.
  • 2/21:  Local merchants provided prizes for an essay test, including Lasdusky, a choice of articles; Friedlander, handkerchiefs; Saron, a box of candy; Star Drug Store company, two pound box of candy; and Half Bros., a five dollar prize.
  • 2/24:  At a meeting of the Homestead District Chamber of Commerce the previous evening, the committees were named — I.J. Goldston to Charities; Jos. M. Katz to Industries; Joseph Lasdusky, B. Friedlander, Jos. Freed, Morris Friedlander, Mark Fischel, Harry Glick, Jos. Glick, Sam. Glick, I.J. Goldston, Morris Grinberg, I. Grossman, Half Bros., A.L. Hepps, Harry Haupt, Louis Jacobson, Ben Little, Jos. Lazar, H. Lazerovitz, I. Lincoff, Jacob Little, Max Mallinger, Aaron Melnik, Max Meyer, Israel Roth, Harry Salaman, Hyman Sapeer, Dan Saron, Reuben Schermer, Emanuel Schwartz, Louis Schwartz, George Siegel, I. Samuels, Joseph Weinberger, Aaron Weis, Albert Gross, and Louis Freeman to Mercantile Affairs; and Mark Fischel to Recreation and Parks.  Morris Half was the 1st Vice President.
  • 3/8:  Morris Half and the two others on the Building Committee for the Homestead Hospital wrote a letter, published in the paper, rejecting all the bids received for construction as being too expensive.
  • 3/16:  The Mercantile Commission of the Chamber of Commerce adopted resolution denouncing “any merchant who conducts his business in violation of existing laws and the spirit of the honest dealing” and praising “efforts in the aid of speedy prosecution and conviction of merchants.”  It was signed by Joseph Lasdusky, Chairman, and Leo L. Half, Secretary of the commission.  “The Retail Merchant has become a vital factor in the economic distribution of the world’s production, and…the Retail Store has developed into a Community Institution,” their resolutions noted.
  • 3/17:  Leo Half was elected to the committee to mage the upcoming Boy Scout campaign.
  • 3/20:   Team captains for the boy scouts drive included Arthur M. Grossman and Mr. Goldstone.
  • 3/26:  For the Boy Scout campaign starting April 6th, Leo Half, Arthur M. Grossman, Mark Fischel, and I.J. Goldston were assigned fundraising roles, with Half as a team director.  (All this was announced at a luncheon at the Steel Works Hotel.)
  • 3/30:  “Vice and gambling” were rampant in Homestead, and many were concerned.  The Mercantile Affairs Committee of the Homestead District Chamber of Commerce passed a resolution “vehemently [denouncing] any merchant who conducts his business in violation of existing laws and the spirit of honest dealings.”  It was signed by Jos. Lasdusky as chairman of the committee and Leo L. Half as its secretary.  Later in the meeting, the standing committees of the Chamber were appointed, including Leo Half on membership.
  • 4/3:  Boy Scout Campaign workers were instructed to meet Monday evening for a preliminary meeting.  Amongst the “prominent speakers” set to deliver “peppery” talks was Leo Half.  (And Jos. Lasdusky was added as a fundraising captain.)
  • 4/14:  The final report of the Boy Scout drive put the Jewish fundraisers in the middle of the pack.  Lasdusky raised 500.00, but Grossman netted 84.00, Fischel 50.00, and Goldston 18.00.  Overall the drive was a success.
  • 4/28:  The membership committee of the Homestead District Chamber of Commerce over dinner at the Steel Works Hotel the previous evening decided to have a membership drive in May.  “Some very interesting remarks were given by Mr. Leo Half of the Half Brothers Furniture Company, who told of his experiences during a similar campaign.”
  • 6/3:  An article with a bio and photograph highlighted Leo L. Half‘s role as captain of the Chamber of Commerce membership drive.  “As chairman of the Membership Committee last year, Mr. Half brought the membership from 175 to a total of 750, and that he will do his share during the present campaign cannot be doubted.”
  • 7/15: On 7/12 the Homestead Council passed an ordinance prohibiting parking cars on Eighth avenue between 7-11 PM in the evening to relieve congestion and to leave access to fire hydrants (then called fire plugs). “A storm of protested has greeted [this] action of council.” Numerous merchants were quoted in the paper. Some were:
    • Benj. Friedlander, Eighth avenue merchant–‘I am against the ordinance. I think when people come down town to shop in their cars they should be allowed to leave their cars wherever they want to and for as long as they want to.'”
    • Joseph Lasdusky says that this ordinance is not a good one for the people who come down street to shop on Saturday night like to leave their machines outside of the store they are buying in and not have to walk two or three blocks up a side street to deposit their bundles…” He also pointed out that council refused to cooperate with the Mercantile Affairs Committee of the Chamber of Commerce (of his he is the chair).
    • Louis Freeman, the Eighth avenue fruit and vegetable dealer–‘This ordinance is an outrate and uncalled for. It is not a good proposition for business men or for the people. When people park their cars on Ninth or Seventh avenue the car is liable to heft and the goods in the car are more liable to theft. Automobiles on the street make a town look progressive…”
  • 7/16:  While the town waited for the burgess to return to veto the measure, the protest continued.  The paper quoted more businessmen against it, including Morris Half, who pointed out that “the owners of automobiles who desire to park their cars, merchants and any other occupying buildings on Eighth avenue should at least have been given the privilege of a hearing…With the width of Eighth avenue, I cannot feel that it is necessary…”  On 8/10 the paper announced that the burgess vetoes the ordinance.  “We think the purpose of this ordinance praiseworthy, but believe the end desired can be attained in another way.”
  • 7/14:  “The Scout camp at North Girard is going in fine shape,” noted the paper.  Leaders from the the Jewish troop were amongst the overall leaders for the camp, which included boys from all the district’s troops.  E.A. Haupt was Asst. Camp Directory and Harry M. Lasday was bugler.  Haupt “ferried loads of lumber on a scow in torrents of rain” to help build “the new wooden mess hall.”  “Caldwell and Lasday stand around and argue.  The bugling of Harry Maurice Lasday, while lying in bed is very fine.”
  • 7/24:  A letter by “Samuel W. Hepps, Camp Secretary, Camp Homestead, B.S.A.” described the activities at the district’s Boy Scout camp in North Girard.
  • 8/2:  The second group of boys arrived at boy scout camp, and the paper related their latest activitiesMr. I. Grossman was a camp visitor.
  • 8/6:  Another letter from Camp Homestead related how the boys “are all having the time of their young lives.”  Mr. Hepps and Mr. Haupt led athletic teams, Mr. Haupt led the daily activities, and Mr. Lasday and Mr. Hepps assisted.  “Altogether this is the best staff of Officers and the best Camp ever conducted by the Homestead Council.”
  • 8/10:  The latest letter related, “The Boy Scouts at Camp Homestead at North Girard continue to have a wonderful time.  Wednesday night a mock trial was held.  Mr. Grossman, a well known business man of Homestead and a visitor at camp, was accused of the serious crime of A.W.O.L. and getting too much ginger ale while on a visit to Erie.  Two members of the Allegheny County Bar acted as attorneys.”  One was his nephew, Arthur GrossmanSamuel Hepps was judge.  “After a good deal of fun the jury returned a verdict of guilty, when the defendant was sentence to serve twenty years on the Sahara desert….Tent No. 6 won the box of candy for the best appearance during the week.  The boys in this tent are Harry Feinstein, Herbert Hepps, Martin Hepps and Isadore ShermerMr. Haupt is on the job looking after the activities and does not allow any time to drag.  The boys are all having a time long to be remembered.”
  • 8/11:  “Yesterday being Sunday, the boys attended church, the Catholic boys in charge of Mr. Sanitrik went to Girard to church and the Protestant boys attended church at Girard accompanied by Messrs. Grinstead, McCready, Hager, Sherwin and Zacharias.  The Jewish boys held their services Saturday morning at the look-out facing Lake Erie.  Last night a scout Vesper service was held in camp.  The speakers consisted of Messrs. McCready, Sherwin, Franklin, Zacharias, Arthur Grossman, I. Grossman, Forest Weghorst, Douglas Hough and Martin Hepps, a very impressive service was held.”  The letter went on to discuss the upcoming vaudeville show and past baseball games involving Feinstein, M. Hepps, H. Hepps, Eskowitz, Saron, H. Magram, and Grossman.  “Wednesday afternoon two baseball teams from the camp will play two games of ball with the Jewish orphans home at Fairview…The Homestead boys expect to bring home the bacon, but they have a tough foe to meet, as the orphan boys have not been defeated this year…Visitors at camp yesterday consisted of Daniel Saron, Mr. Shermer, Mr. Magram” and others.  “Sam Fineburg and Cy Lazar also arrived.”
  • 8/13:  “Monday night, a big vaudeville show was held in the Mess Hall, the performers all being secured at a great expense from New York City,” updated the latest letter.  “The Program was opened by Signor Hagereski, and his company of hypnotists.  The Signor’s company consisted of Senor’s Sanitikit, Ladayeski and Heppetus…A quartette consisting of Gross, Hepps and Beedler, got the hook, Hough and Lasday next entertained in a breezy sketch entitled, nothing much.  Sam Fineburg gave a monologue that looked very much like some of Jim Thortons professional stuff.”
  • 8/19:  An article surveying women’s reactions to gaining suffrage quoted Mrs. Max Mallinger, “Women should be allowed to vote and I surely am pleased that what we have fought for it to become a reality.”  (Now how much longer would it take for women to go by their own names!)
  • 8/23:  “The third section of scouts arrived in camp safely on Sunday,” began the latest letter.  “Edward Haupt, the athletic director, has helped the boys spend the afternoons in games and other sports…Harry Lasday is helping the boys in bugling and some of them are getting be regular musicians.”
  • 8/30:  Women began registering to vote in Homestead on 8/30.  So far 8 women registered in the first ward, 13 in the second, 2 in the fourth, and 31 in the fifth (no figured for the third yet).  In the second ward:  “Mrs. Evelyn Robeson 469 Third avenue, Republican.  Mrs. Bertha Hepps, 406 Dixon street, Republican.  Mrs. Bertha Schwartz, 525 Fifth avenue, Republican.”   9/1:  “According to Mrs. John S. Oursler General Chairlady of the Homestead district of the league of Women Citizens” and wife of the superintendent of the steel mill, “only a very small percentage of the women in the district have registered to date.”  This day was the last day.  There 890 so far — 351 of them from Homestead.
  • 3/22/1920

    3/22/1920

    10/11:  Starting in March, a movement formed to consolidate all three boroughs — Homestead, Munhall, and West Homestead — into one.  The decision was made during the summer to put it up to a vote in November.  The paper was in favor of this idea, and published numerous articles about leading townsmen and organizations who were also in favor. On this date the Citizens Committee on Consolidation of Munhall, Homestead and West Homestead “have announced the complete personnel of the committee for the three boroughs.”  From Homestead: Meyer I. Grinberg, A.C. Hepps, Samuel Mervis.

  • 10/21:  In anticipation of the upcoming Cot Club carnival, “two beautiful lamps in Half Bros.’ window which are to be raffled on Saturday evening are being very much admired.”
  • 10/30:  The paper published a long statement by Joseph Lasdusky, whose “keen insight…in civic matters is the result of 30 years’ close connection with the business and social problems of the district and his great interest in all things relating to the welfare of the community.  He takes the view that it is impossible for the efficient business man to oppose consolidation because consolidation embodies the very principles on which successful business is founded.”  If you care for the details, read this article.  (11/3:  Consolidation failed 1327-1392.  It carried in Homestead by 3:1, but failed in West Homestead by 4:1 and Munhall by 3:1.)  The paper guessed that women, voting for the first time, made the difference.
  • 10/26: The Hallowe’en parade was back! There hadn’t been one since 1917.  Joseph Lasdusky was named a judge. 10/27:  Entrants into the costume contest could pick up tickets at various business houses, including Star Drug Store, Dan Saron’s, and Half Brothers. Prizes were contributed so far by A. Ruben & Co. (50 New Bachelor cigars) and A. Cohen’s ($2 box of Johnson’s candy). Cash was contributed by Half Bros. 5.00, A. Lefkowitz 5.00, Sam Lewis 2.00, James Schwartz 1.00, and Freemont Marks 2.00.  10/29: Additional contributions came in from Dan Saron 2.00, I.J. Goldston 2.00, Trau’s Store 1.00, and Jos. Lasdusky 5.00. Additional prizes came from Freed’s Cash Market (5 lbs. sugar), Miller & Port ($2.50 box candy), Mark Fishel (one half dozen 85c. records), I. Miller (men’s $2.50 tie), Meyer Grinberg (four piece combination set), and B. Friedlander (ladies’ umbrella).
  • 10/30: The final list of prizes included from Victor Shoe store (ladies’ slippers), H.L. Little (ladies’ spats), Morris Grinberg (1 pair ladies silk hose). The costume categories were slightly less absurd than in the past, but there were still ethnic categories like Hebrew, Italian, Irish, English, and Japanese.
  • 11/1: Friedlander‘s won first prize for best window display; Fishel‘s Jewelry store got an Honorable Mention. Half Bros. won for second best float and A. Lefkowitz for third best. Evan E. Evans won “First Best Hebrew.”  Also there were a couple late-breaking prizes — Lincoff‘s (ladies’ purse) and Sam Glick Meat Market (small ham) — and a .25 donation from I.J. Miller.
  • 11/19: At the previous day’s meeting of the Mercantile committee of the Chamber of Commerce, presided over by Chairman Joseph Lasdusky, the group decided to meet monthly. Ben Little was one of three men assigned to arrange the next month’s meeting.
  • 11/23:  Morris Half was the General Chairman of the Red Cross drive then going on.
  • 12/10:  Chairman Lasdusky presided over the next meeting on 12/9, with sixth merchants present.  Mr. Half spoke to encourage the members to support the Chamber of Commerce.  The main speaker was the group’s new secretary.  Ben Little was part of the two-man committee “that arranged yesterday’s affair and it proved a big success.”
  • 12/20:  “The Mercantile Affairs Committee of the Homestead District Chamber of Commerce is one of the most active committees in the Chamber.  Under its Chairman Mr. Lasdusky assisted by active sub-committees, two luncheons for business men have been held and a number of things of interest to the entire community have been handled.”  He announced sub-committees.  The Luncheon committee included Benj. Friedlander, the Waste paper committee was chaired by Morris Half, and Program Advertising included Ben Little, Meyer Grinberg, and Jos. Lasdusky (because “program advertising was becoming a nuisance with no adequate return”).  12/22: At the regular business meeting of the Chamber of Commerce, “an interesting report was read covering the work of the Mercantile Affairs Committee for the past month, under the direction of Mr. Jos. Lasdusky, Chairman.”
  • 12/21:  A Nomination Committee for candidates to run for the Board of Directors for the Chamber of Commerce included Leo HalfJos. Lasdusky was one of the Directors whose term expired in January.

School & Sports

  • 1/7:  The Munhall 8th grade basketball team included Saron as forward.
  • 1/12:  The Homestead High School honor roll for the previous month (students neither absent nor tardy) included:  Harry Feinstein, Sheffield Freedman, Bernard Grinberg, Allan Widom, Freida Hilk, Harry Widom, Herman Magram, Francis Friedlander, Sarah Jacobson, Mollie Mervis, and Elsie Rosenbaum.
  • 2/10: The Homestead High School honor roll for the previous month (students neither absent nor tardy) included:  Jacob Carp, Margaret Freedman, Minnie Gross, Sadie Lefkowitz, Harold Schwartz, Elsie Rosenbaum, Mildred Fogel, Samuel Hepps, William Fogel, Morris Berger, Bernard Grinberg, Nathan Lefkowitz, Harry Mervis, Allan Widom, Sheffield Freeman, Harry Eskowitz, Arthur Glick, Samuel Jacobson.”
  • 2/11:  Lasday played center in Munhall High School’s latest basketball game.  They lost.  3/6:  He played with the team against Homestead and lost again.
  • 2/26:  Benj. Trau authored an article about the upcoming “amateur boxing carnival.”  He published a few articles throughout the year — about local boxer Ray Pryel and other sports doing — but far less than in the past.
  • 3/6: The Homestead High School honor roll for the previous month (students neither absent nor tardy) included:  Minnie Gross, Harry Widom, and Regina Weiss.
  • 3/20:  Harry Rosenbaum and Philip Hilk were in the Second Ward school play.
  • 3/23:  The next day Homestead high school would start a page of news in the town’s paper.  The staff included Allan Widom as editor.
  • 3/24:  The Homestead high school page had lots of interesting tidbits. “Misses Haupt and Case chaperoned parties of students at the Pitt Theatre Sat night to see Hamlet.”  Albert Schwartz recited “Winter Time” and Dorothy Rosenbaum “Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address” at the semi-monthly meeting of the Sir Walter Scott Literary Society of the Sophomore English class.  At the Longfellow Literary Society Morris Berger recited (or spoke on?) “The Magic Table” and Bernard Grinberg “Ready to Fight the Deep.”  Of the junior class’s literary societies, the Longfellow Literary Society had Morris Berger as secretary and the Hawthorne Literary Society had Allan Widom as secretary.
  • 4/7:  On the latest Homestead high page, the alumni notes mentioned that Jeanette Friedlander was in playlet given at Margaret Morrison school, which she is attending. For the Washington Irving literary society, Harry Mervis was leader for the next week and as part of the program would recite “The Lady or the Tiger.”
  • 4/9:  The Homestead High School honor roll for the previous month (students neither absent nor tardy) included:  Samuel Hepps, Bernard Grinberg, Allan Widom, William Fogel, Sidney Schwartz, Harry Weinberger, Jacob Carpe, Harold Schwartz, Evelyn Mervis.
  • 5/7: The Homestead High School honor roll for the previous month (students neither absent nor tardy) included Morris Berger.
  • 5/18:  The Homestead high school graduates included Ida Phyllis Friedlander, Esther Regina Widom, Clara Lefkowitz, Max Berger, Isadore Eskowitz, and Eva Little.  Graduation took place on 6/1.  5/31 the class attended a baccalaureate service at the First Baptist church.  There were 16 boys and 28 girls in class, apparently one of the largest classes since 1918.
  • 6/7:  “Miss Gertrude Friedlander has completed her studies at the University of Pittsburg and resumed her position at the Friedlander store.”
  • 6/7:  Jacob M. Hepps graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in mines.  6/8:  Other Pitt graduates included Joseph E. Gross, with a degree in Chemistry, and David Katz, brother of Jos. M. Katz.
  • 6/10:  Miss May Frieldander of Indian Rock, Fla. has been living with her grandmother, Mrs. J. Gross of Eleventh avenue and graduated this week from the University of Pittsburg where she took a post graduate course. Miss Friedlander is a graduate of the University of Tallahassee. She will leave for her home next week.
  • 6/23:  “Mrs. M.T. Seigal attended the graduation exercises of Peabody high school last night. Leonard Aaron, grandson of Mrs. Seigle, and formerly of Homestead, was one of the graduates.”
  • 10/5:  “Misses Gene (sic) and Gertrude Friedlander are resuming their studies in the Pitt University.”
  • 11/6:  Attendance records for the previous month:  Celia Carpe, Rose Fisher, Minnie Gross, Lillian Fogal, Sara Jacobson, Samuel Jacobson, Maurice Hardon (sic?), Lena Mehalovitz.
  • 11/11:  “Miss Jennie Friedlander of Eleventh avenue who is attending the University of Pittsburgh has been pledged to the Alpha Epsilon Phi Fraternity. She is a member of the class of ’18 H.H.S.”
  • 11/24:  The fourth meeting of the Hamilton Debating Club of Homestead High School was held on 11/22.  Its president was Harry MervisMorris Berger represented the negative position for a debate on compulsory military training in high school.  His team lost.  In the next debate on government ownership of railroads, the negative side would be represented by Harry Mervis and Nathan Lefkowitz.  “The Hamilton Debating Club is an organization which should be watched very closely by the students in the school.  It is making a name for itself, and will go down in the history of the school as the best boys organization in the Homestead High School,” wrote Samuel Seldis ’21.

Business Doings

  • 1/9:  Mr. Ben Little of Ben Little’s Shoe Store left Saturday for Boston where he will attend the National Shoe Men’s Convention.  Mr. Little expects to be gone for two weeks and will return via New York with the last word in ideas and goods for Spring footwear.  1/24:  “Ben Little, of Ben Little’s shoe store has returned from the Shoe Men’s Convention which was held in Boston.  After the convention Mr. Little returned via New York and Philadelphia where he finished his spring buying and as a result will have a full supply of the footwear which will be the last worn in the spring styles.  Mr. Little is also opening a hosiery department for children in which he will carry Dr. Posner’s hosiery for children.  Later he will open a department for men and ladies’ hosiery.”
  • 1/15:  “Another big deal in Eighth avenue property was made yesterday when J.F. Steele, the news and sporting goods dealer, sold his building at 226 East Eighth avenue to Hyman Sapeer & Brother, shoe merchants of 521 East Eighth avenue for $17,000.  The lots which is near the center of the business district is 25 by 110 and has erected on it a three-story building with a commodious store room on the first floor and apartments on the second and third.”
  • 1/16:  On an ad for the McKeesport-Homestead Oil & Gas Co., Max Mallinger of 407 8th was listed as a contact for local people who wished to invest.  An oil boom in McKeesport had been on since August 1919.
  • 5/29/1920

    5/29/1920

    1/20:  “Mark Fischel, local jeweler, has completed negotiations for the purchase of the Kane hotel and the two store apartment building in the rear.  This property has been owned by Ella O’Donnell and the consideration is reported as $23,000.”

  • 1/26/1920: Ad for McKeesport-Standard Gas and Oil Enterprises, naming Leo L. Half as the local repsentative

    1/26/1920: Ad for McKeesport-Standard Gas and Oil Enterprises, naming Leo L. Half as the local repsentative

    1/21:  “Mr. Leo L. Half, local representative of the McKeesport Gas & Oil Enterprise was a McKeesport visitor yesterday.  While there, he was in conference with Mr. Reuben and Mr. Lahman who are managing the affairs of the above company.  Mr. Half was advised that the drilling of No. Two well would be started no later than Saturday of this week…”  The remainder of the article described the nationwide demand for shares of this company as part of an oil boom in McKeesport that started in August 1919 and led to the creation of 300 companies!  In case you were wondering how this all turned out:  8/31:  “Over-drilling has been given as the cause of the short life of the field.  It has been estimated that in leases, well drilling, stock selling, and licenses, more than $20,000,000 have been spent in the field, or $20 for every dollar’s worth of gas it gave up.”  The remnants of the “Snake Hollow” gas field still vex local residents to this very day.

  • 1/27:  “Some clever sneak thieves were at work on Eighth avenue and with the use of a skeleton key opened the show case of Jacob Little, a shoe merchant at 311 East Eighth avenue, and stole five pair of high grade shoes.  The robbery was discovered this morning by Hyman Little, a son of the proprietor, and was reported to Chief of Police Davies.  The robbery is thought to have taken place late Saturday night and was only discovered when the case was opening this morning to place on exhibition some of the latest style shoes the firm has received.”
  • 2/3:  “Mr. Ralph Lasday of the Lasdusky Department Store, has accepted a position as assistant to the General Manager of Kaufmann’s in Pittsburg.  Mr. Lasday has been connected with his father’s store for the past year and has been active in many municipal and community affairs.  Mr. Lasday is well qualified to undertake his new position.  He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, 1915, was formerly connected with Montgomery Ward & Co., of Chicago, and L. Bamberger & Co. of Newark, New Jersey.  Before assuming his new duties he will join Mrs. Lasday in Philadelphia and they will tour the East for a week or two.”
  • 2/4:  “Mr. Morris Half of Half Bros., accompanied by Miss Feinstein, the new buyer and manager of this firm’s ready to wear department, are in New York this week completing the spring and early summer purchases for this very popular section of the Half Bros. store.  Miss Feinstein, who has had a number of years’ experience with some of Pittsburgh’s best stores, both retail and wholesale, promises the women of Homestead some delightful surprises in the way of women’s apparel.  While in New York Mr. Half will also attend the annual toy fair where purchases for next Christmas will be made.”
  • 2/5:  “Julius Felsher, formerly employed by the American Clearers & Dyers of Amity street, left recently for New Brighton and has opened up a tailoring shop there.”
  • 2/9:  “Joseph Freed, of Heisel street, who has purchased the building at 615 8th avenue, will open up a grocery store in the near future.”
  • 2/10:  “Misses Katherine Navack and Mary Forgask, of Lasdusky’s Department store, are leaving for New York on a buying trip…L. Lasday, manager of the Lasdsusky Dept store, returned yesterday from a buying trip in the East. Mrs. Lasdusky, of Squirrel Hill, left last evening, for New York, on a buying trip.”
  • 2/28:  “One of the busiest places in Homestead is that of Half Bros.’ Big Department store on East Eighth avenue…It not only claims there is no need for going away to buy but is successfully demonstrating that statement daily to its large and ever increasing trade…The Messenger desires to congratulate Half Bros. upon their success and at the same time take a little share in the credit for the reason that Half Bros. have depended solely upon The Messenger for its advertising which it has carried daily.”  Full article here.
  • 3/2:  “The Jewelers of Homestead have organized to close their shops of 7 o’clock in the evening commencing March 1st.  This movement was started for the benefit of their employes (sic) and the jewelers hope the trade will look at is in a business like manner and do their shopping during the day allowing the one hour in the evening after 6 o’clock for the accomodation (sic) of the man who works all day.”  Signed by 6 jewelers including I. Lincoff and I. Finberg.
  • 3/9:  “Samuel Glick, meat dealer on Eighth avenue, Homestead, has purchased two of the best flat buildings in the Munhall district.  Each contains six flats.  The one facing Library park at 544 Ninth avenue, a beautiful buff brick, was owned by F.J. Brickner and the other on Tenth avenue, was owned by J.B. Coen.”
  • 3/10:  “A. Kahn, of 131 East Eighth avenue, who recently bought the property from A.E. Miller, 343 Eighth avenue, will remodel the building for his new store.  He has also leased the building now occupied by American Woolen Mills Co. at 227 East Eighth avenue and will open a store there…Meyer Grinberg, of 216 East Eighth avenue, who bought the property occupied by Donahoe’s store will have the old building torn down and a new one erected.  Part of the building on Seventh avenue has already been built.”
  • 3/13:  “Half Bros. Store has been the scene of great activity for the past week due to the extensive amount of work being done getting ready for the annual Spring Opening which will be held on Thursday next, March 18th…”  The article goes on to describe the plans for an evening and afternoon party, a demonstration of cookstove, and the distribution of useful gifts.
  • 3/15:  “One of the most practical and interesting demonstrations ever held in Homestead is now in progress at Half Bros. Store.  Miss Mary E. Perkins, who is extremely well versed in all matters pertaining to expert fireless cooking, is giving some excellent talk and practical illustrations of the ease and economy of this modern method of preparing food…”
  • “3/15: Mr. Lasdusky, of 337 Eighth avenue, left for a business trip to New York yesterday. 3/19:  “Mr. Lasdusky, of Eighth avenue has been to New York for several days selecting new goods for their spring opening this evening turned home this morning.”
  • 3/17:  “Lasdusky’s, trimmed in her new suit of Spring color, will be a great attraction on Eighth avenue tomorrow night when this ever growing progressive store will stage their Spring opening…Mr. Lasdusky is again in New York, his second trip for this opening dispatching only the latest goods for the largest stock in Homestead…Mr. Lewis Lasday, manager of the store, has arranged the decoration in a most pleasing manner…”  Full article here.
  • 3/18: “Today begins Friedlander‘s opening showing spring styles in Ladies’, Misses’ and Children’s Ready to Wear apparel The modes which are being shown are of the latest, having been selected with great care in New York.”
  • 3/18: “The sun smiled on Half Bros. grand opening today and as a result of the fine weather and the unusual attractions presented, big crowd fairly swarmed…Those who attend the evening found every claim of the firm fully as represented and everyone was full of praise for the splendid arrangements, fine stock on exhibition and the special attractions…”
  • 3/19: A long article reviewed the Half Bros.‘ spring opening, noting the “Three professional living models” who “displayed the latest things in spring attire.  The very neat footwear was supplied by Ben Little.”  More about the opening in the article.  The paper also published the list of prize winners at their opening drawn from invitation cards left at the store.
  • 3/19:  “Lasdusky‘s opening last evening was well attended by the many patrons of the store, and one and all were enthusiastic over the display…The store was most artistically decorated with Spring Flowers and beautiful hanging baskets and the excellent music was rendered by Lasdasky’s own orchestra…”
  • 3/20: “When the reporter from the Messenger viewed the fashion show at Half Bros. store on Thursday, she was greatly impressed by the appearance and remarkably good style shown in the garments which were worn by the living models, and was (sic) displayed in the Ready-to-Wear section…..Mr. Half remarked that…entire credit…was due to the the good taste and excellent judgement of the new buyer of this department, Miss D.A. Feinstein…’I have had over twelve years of experience in both retail and wholesale stores in Pittsburg,’ said Miss Feinstein, ‘ and I never, until now, had any idea that in a smaller district a store could develop such a loyal following as Half Bros. have…'”
  • 3/22:  “The Tattler — Max Mallinger, a confectionary dealer, is not a large man, but needs more space to turn around, so he bought the Rattigan block from Kuhn.”
  • 3/26:  “Mr. Lasdusky left last night again for New York City to buy millinery…It seems that the demand for Easter hats this year has far surpassed that of former years…Both Mr. Lasdusky and Mr. Lasday…desire to thank the public for the splendid interest they manifested during opening week…”  3/27:  “Mr. Lasdusky of Eighth avenue who has been to New York returned home this morning.”
  • 3/29:  “Morris Half of Half Bros., left last evening for New York City, to attend the semi-annual rug and carpet exhibit, which starts this morning.  In addition to rug and carpet purchases, Mr. Half will also make some additional purchases for the ready-to-wear departments.  Half Bros.’ store has enjoyed an usual long business this spring.  Mr. Half is expected home the end of the week.”
  • 4/8:  A notice was published that I. Miller, formerly at 412 Dixon, has taken over Jones haberdashery “and wish to ask all my friends to come and patronize me at 203 8th ave.”
  • 4/12:  “Mr Kahn, a well known business man, of 135 East eighth avenue has moved to his new place of business, at 343 East Eighth avenue.”
  • 4/16:  “The semi-annual, get-together-meeting of Half Bros.’ employes was held in the store last evening.”  Miss Feinstein helped oversee the feast, and Morris, R., and Leo L. Half all made remarks.  Buying increased during 1919, they noted, and the bonus plan was switched to quarterly from semi-annually.
  • 4/28:  “The big Ament Apartments on Margaret street, Munhall have been sold for $23,000.00 to Henry Glick.”
  • 4/29:  A long article gave the history of Joseph Lasdusky in Homestead, both his mercantile and civic pursuits.  The called him “the oldest merchant in Homestead,” who started his business in 1891 “when Homestead was literally in its teens.”
  • 5/8: “Mr. Joseph Lasdusky, of Lasdusky’s department store, left last night for New York City, where he will purchase a large line of women’s and children’s wear for the summer season. Mr. Lasdusky is elated over the fine success of the great Reduction Sale and takes this means to thank the people of this district for their co-operation. Mr. Lasdusky will be gone a week, visiting many New York and Philadelphia fashion markets.
  • 5/19: “Announcement is made today of the installation of a new department in the Ben Little shoe store. Mr. Little has added a complete line of Monitor brand men’s and women’s hosiery and this added feature will probably be well received by his many patrons.”
  • 5/21:  “Two daring young bandits, aged 12 and 13 years,” confessed to numerous robberies when they were captured.  One was “entering Meyer Grinberg‘s store, 216 East Eighth avenue, where they stole a searchlight and other article.  5/22:  The attorney for one of the bandits was “C.F. Hepps” — probably my great-uncle A.C. Hepps.
  • 5/27:  “Mr. Joseph Freedman of Boston has accepted a permanent position with Lasdusky.”
  • 5/28:  A new editor for The MessengerBert F. Kline — who came to Homestead after six years’ experience managing The Herald at New Castle and in Wheeling before that.  “He is a man of splendid ability and a courteous and affable gentleman.”
  • 6/5:  “Louis Lasday returned today from New York where he went a week ago on a buying trip.”
  • 6/9:  “The property formerly owned by Peter Fey, former Homestead grocer but now of Los Angeles, Cal., has been sold to E. Schwartz of this city…The building is a three story brick 37×122 feet located on Eighth avenue near Ammon street.  The amount involved in the transaction was $31,000.”
  • 6/15:  “To-day starts the 21st Anniversary Sale of Friedlander‘s, ‘The Store Ahead,'” and a nice article gave the history of the store and its present success.
  • 6/18:  A long letter from Meyer I. Grinberg “To my Friends and Loyal Customers” re-tells the story of his twenty-six years as a merchant in Homestead and looks forward to the Grand Opening of his “new and large, commodious and convenient store at No. 219 8th avenue.”
  • 6/25:  “Celebrating his nineteenth anniversary of successful business in Homestead, Ben Little, popular dealer of 210 Eighth avenue inaugurates anything ever offered to Homestead district buyers.”  This article also gave a bit of history of his store.  7/1:  “Realizing that he is offering rare bargains in order to make his nineteenth anniversary sale a success, big crowds of customers have been taxing the capacity of the shoe store of Ben Little on Eighth avenue and all have been satisfied with the wonder values offered in the big sale…”  7/7:  “The 19th anniversary sale of the Ben Little shoe store goes merrily on and each day adds hundreds to the satisfied customers who have taken advantage of the splendid offerings of this Eighth avenue firm…”  7/15:  “Ben Little’s nineteenth anniversary sale will be brought to a successful end with the close of business Saturday night…”
  • 6/28:  “Lewis L. Lasday buyer of the Ladies’ wearing apparel of Lasdusky’s Big Store, has left for the Eastern markets to purchase a new summer stock.  Only three weeks ago Mr. Lasday was East and purchased what was thought then a complete stock to cover the entire summer months but, from the fact that the purchase was so well made and prices so low, Mr. Lasdusky has to send his buyer to the Eastern Market again within such a short period of time.  Mr. Lasday will be gone for the balance of the week and shipments are looked for every day.”
  • 6/29:  “Just 26 years ago today Morris Grinberg proprietor of Grinberg’s Department Store started in business.”  And thus begins yet another anniversary article!
  • 7/7:  “Fifteen years ago the H.L. Little Store opened for business in Homestead in a small and unpretentious store, with stocks of shoes quite limited.  Today this store at 321 8th avenue extends thru to 7th avenue, which is filled to capacity with the best makes and fashionable shoes for men, women and children, and is generally regarded as one of the most progressive shoe stores in Western Pennsylvania.  The firm is fittingly celebrating the 15th anniversary, beginning tomorrow and continuing for 15 days with what is perhaps the greatest shoe sale ever conducted by any store…”  7/15:  “The H.L. Little shoe store at 321 Eighth avenue is celebrating their 15 years’ successful shoe selling in Homestead with a big special sale…The firm is indeed to be congratulated not only on their success, but their progressiveness as well, as the H.L. Little Shoe Store surely does things in a most progressive manner.”
  • 7/13:  “It was announced this morning by Chief W.H. Davies that Mrs. Patience Morris, colored woman of Gold Way, arrested yesterday by Patrolman Michael Pyers as an alleged shoplifter in Ignatz Grossman‘s store, 605 East Eighth avenue, had also visited the Nifty Shoppe, Eighth avenue…and Morris Grinberg‘s, 515 East Eighth avenue.  Over $100 worth of…goods are at the police station.  A number of the merchants have identified some of their goods…”  7/15:  Her trial was continuing until next Monday night because the witnesses couldn’t be presented at the hearing the previous evening.
  • 7/14:  “Early this morning Louis Freeman‘s fruit and vegetable store at 214 East Eighth avenue was entered and the cash register opened and $15 in small change taken.  The robbery was discovered by Mrs. Freeman, wife of the proprietor, when she opened up the store this morning…”  7/16:  “Shortly after 10 o’clock last night Louis Freeman captured Howard Bishop, aged 11 years, in the act of robbing the cash register…Mr. Freeman’s store was entered on Tuesday and Wednesday nights and after closing the store last night he returned to keep watch for the robber.”  The story of the exciting capture is in the article.
  • 7/19:  Six months into prohibition, “the most sensational raid and seizure of spirituous liquor ever made in the Pittsburgh district took place Saturday afternoon in Homestead, when a large force of Federal prohibition agents went into 11 hotels and saloons and confiscated about 250 gallons of liquor in seven of the places visited.”  One of the places where liquor was confiscated was Ben Schwartz, 318 Dixon street.  They did not find liquor at Sam Margolis, 448 East Third avenue.  It was believed that word of the raid leaked in advance, which is why less was found than expected.  (Later, it came out that the prohibition agents were bribed.)
  • 7/21:  “Max Adlersberg, a meat dealer of 330 East Eighth avenue paid into the Bureau of Food the sum of sixty dollars for selling decomposed meat.  This is Adlersberg’s third violation…”  The “Bureau of Food was active in the crusade against meat dealers who buy second and third quality meat, then retail the decomposed meat to the public.”  An editorial pointed out, “The man was fined but so long as he is making a big profit on this dangerous meat he can well afford to pay an occasional fine and continue sale of it.”
  • 7/24:  “Mrs. Kahn of the specialty shop has returned from a buying trip to New York and Philadelphia.”
  • 8/2:  “Mr. Morris Half of Half Bros. and Miss Dora Feinstein who has charge of the firm’s ready-to-wear section are in New York completing the purchases of the fall and winter merchandise for Half Bros. ready-to-wear department.  Judging by the advance arrivals of fall garments which are being received daily, the women of Homestead will have an opportunity of buying at home, what are unquestionably some of the most beautiful and exclusive models which have ever been displayed here.  Mr. Half accompanied by Mrs. Half will spend his vacation at one of the eastern summer resorts.”
  • 8/4:  “Meyer Grinberg is moving the goods from his warehouse into his new store on Eighth avenue.”
  • 8/12/1920

    8/12/1920

    8/12:  “Meyer I. Grinberg‘s new store, most modern and beautiful, was yesterday thrown open to the public and thousands swarmed to Homestead’s new store and were delightfully surprised at the beautiful building and the fine arrangement.”  Full description of the store in the article.

  • 8/16:  “Al Gross of the Gross Department Store will leave this evening for New York on a business trip.”  8/23:  “Al Gross of Gross Department Store has returned from New York City where he spent the last week making his fall purchases.”
  • 8/16:  “This morning about 2:15 after escorting the boys who had just returned from the boy scout camp, Scoutmaster Harry Margolis and Meyer Jacobson, proprietor of Eighth avenue Garage discovered smoke coming from the door of the Wolk Furniture Company at 511 East Eighth avenue.  After awakening the tenants of the second and third floors the Central and Second ward fire departments were notified and after a quick run to the scene and the use of fire extinguishers soon had the fire under control.  The fire was caused by crossed electric wires becoming loose…The damage did not amount to a very large amount…”
  • 9/10:  “Half Brothers department store will hold their second Fall Opening tonight and tomorrow…Arrangements have been completed to handle quite a large crowd as Half Brothers opening are always a source of great pleasure to the buying public of Homestead…”  (More.)  9/11:  “Half Bros. store was the mecca for great numbers of Homestead women yesterday afternoon and evening on the occasion of their fall opening in the ready-to-wear section…Miss Dora Feinstein, buyer of this department, came in for all manner of compliments on the attractive and very carefully chosen array of fall garments which she had selected…”  (More.)
  • 9/10:  “Lasdusky‘s are holding their new fall opening this evening and the public is invited to attend…One of the main features of the opening will be the living model showing the beautiful fall suits and dresses, also the handsome fall coats and sport coats, everything in the up-to-the-minute styles…”  (More.)  9/11:  “A very large crowd was in attendance last night at the Fall opening of Lasdusky’s department store, where they were greeted with the various modes and styles that will be prevalent during the coming months…After the opening the employees held a dance on the store dance floor…”  (More.)
  • 9/25:  “The annual corn roast and dance held by the Half Bros. employees together with the members of the firm and their families was held last evening at Homestead Park.  The guests were taken to the park in two trucks and three automobiles.”  The organizing committee included Mr. Marion D. Steinberger.  “The guests included Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Half and Family; Mr. and Mrs. Morris Half and family; Mr. and Mrs. Leo Half and family, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. D. Steinberger…and the Misses Dora Feinstein; Olga KleinAnna Gross; the Messrs. Marion D. Steinberger, Edw. Lowenstein” and others.
  • 10/9:  “Louis Lasday of Lasdusky’s department store is in the eastern cities making purchases of clothing for the ladies ready to wear department…Mr. and Mrs. Miller of Eighth avenue are expected home from a buying trip in the West today.”
  • 10/19:  H.J. O’Donnell purchased the store room now occupied by the Victor Shoe company.  It was unclear where the Victor Shoe company would go.  Robert Davidson bought the building now occupied by H.J. O’Donnell for more than $40,000.  Isacc Lincoff “is figuring on purchasing” Davidson’s former building.
  • 10/21:  Another quarterly Half Bros. employee meeting.  Morris and Leo Half both spoke, quarterly bonus checks were distributed, and M.D. Steinberger and received part of the prize money from a national window display contest.  Full story here.
  • 10/21:  In an article about the latest real estate deals:  “Louis J. Adler property on corner of Eighth avenue and Gold way, sold to Joseph Fried, consideration $8900.”
  • 10/28:  “Lasdusky‘s today are inaugurating a great price slashing sale…At this season the sale is doubly important for there are so many article needed by buyers now and they are given an opportunity to profit in this big sale…”
  • 11/2:  In a long column listing recent real estate transactions — a half million dollars over the past few months — N. Levin to A. Korkos, property at 512 E. 3rd avenue, price $2825; Peter Fey to Emanuel Schwartz, property of 501-503 8th avenue, price $31,000; Peter Fey to Isaac Samuels, property at 118 W. 5th avenue, price $2,600.
  • 11/9:  “Joseph Lasdusky left last evening for New York where he will purchase stock for the holiday trade.”
  • 11/11:  Morris Grinberg, “prominent Eighth avenue merchant” purchased 309 Eighth avenue.  “The location is considered one of the best on the main street.  Mr. Grinberg intends in the near future to erect a modern building block on the site.”
  • 11/13:  “Karl G. Miller, a former business man of this town, has engaged himself with the Glick market at 349 East Eighth avenue.  Mr. Glick being satisfied that he has a man in charge of his store who will have the interest of the customers at heart and will at all times see that they get courtesy and satisfactory treatment…”
  • 11/20: “I.J. Goldston, the well known business man of this district, who has purchased and installed a clothing store in the McMathes building at 237 East Eighth avenue opened his doors for the first public inspection last evening at 7:30 o’clock.” The rest of the article details his 24 years of experience in the clothing business in Homestead. “Mr. Goldston has been ever square-dealing…this policy has brought him to the fore in business circles and had increased his popularity and business many fold…”
  • 11/22: “There are at least eight milk dealers in Homestead who are trying to fool the people and give them milk that is not up to the standard as proved Saturday afternoon last when they were arrested by Pittsburgh officials for violating the Pure Food Laws of Pennsylvania.” They included Lewis Jacobson of 530 Dickson street, Benjamin Seiavitch of 431 Third avenue, and J.W. Weinberger of 517 Fifth avenue. Their fines ranged from $10 to $25. David Samuels of 203 Third avenue was also arrested for violating the laws pertaining to pure soft drinks. He was fined $25.
  • 11/23: In an article about the price of turkeys — “high here but lower than in the city” — the paper notes that “a carload of turkeys, geese and fixed poultry has just been received by the Glick Meat Market but the prices at yet have not been arranged.”
  • 11/25: Joseph Lasduksy sold six houses on McClure street between Eleventh and Twelfty avenue for $30,000. (They were sold individually.)
  • 11/29:  Fifteen cases of whisky were stolen from the residence of George Davis last week.  Ben Schwartz was arrested.  Six young men total were implicated; Schwartz claimed he was just the truck driver “hired to haul the wet goods.”  The owner of the liquor declined to prosecute and wanted to keep the whole matter quiet, which obviously failed since this article was published.
  • 12/11:  “A seemingly harmless street fliration led to the undoing of a pretty local woman…the wife of a local steel worker ‘fell’ for the advances of the well dressed stranger who posed as a traveling man.”  He turned out to be a burglar who hid his loot with her.  “Lincoff, the local jeweler stated this morning to a Messenger reporter that Mrs. Leadbetter called at his place between three weeks and a month ago with a splendid lavalliere, claiming she had no more use for it and she endeavored to pawn it.  For some reason she became disgruntled at what was offered for it and went away without leaving it.”
  • 12/14:  “Some time during the night robbers smashed the glass in the front door of Samuel Glick‘s wholesale liquor Sixth avenue and Amity street and entered the building and cleaned up the cash register.”  They got little money and an unclear quantity of “wet goods.”
  • 12/22/1920: Eskowitz front page ad

    12/22/1920: Eskowitz front page ad

    12/22:  “Robbers secured a truck load of poultry from the Sixth avenue Poultry Market some time during the night and when the proprietor, N. Eskovitz arrived at the storm this morning he discovered his front door open and a good portion of Christmas poultry stock gone…Mr. Eskovitz is incensed over the robbery.  He states that he left a light burning in his place all night and certainly expect some protection” from the local police.  “The loss will amount to several hundred dollars…there appears little hope o locating the robbers as they were not discovered in time and no traces have been left.”  Full details here.

  • 12/24:  “Informations for sale of liquor are now being filed in the office of United States District Attorney D.J. Driscoll in Pittsburgh on charges preferred against alleged local saloonists.”  One was Benjamin J. Swartz.  “It was stated that information had been made some time ago against these men but stress of business delayed the filing.”
  • 12/31:  One last quarterly meeting for Half Bros. employees for 1920.  “The dinner committee consisting of Mr. Marion B. Steinberger, of the furniture sales department, and Miss Dora Feinstein, manager of the Ladies Ready-to-Wear Department provided a fine menu…Mr. M Half gave a short talk dwelling on the fact that the year just coming to a close had been the best year which the firm had ever enjoyed in their twenty-one years of existence in Homestead…All of the thirty-one employees present had been connected with the firm for a period of over 19 years…”  Full write-up here.
  • 12/31:  “A sensation was created among the saloonkeepers when it was announced that additional informations had been filed against violators of the national prohibition act, making a total of 46 informations made in the Homestead District.”  Samuel Margolis and Edward Hepps (probably my great-grandfather Bernard) were in this group.  Happy New Year.

Misfortunes

  • 1/6:  Maurice Hepps, aged 12 years, died yesterday morning at 10 o’clock at the West Penn Hospital where he was taken Sunday morning.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hepps.  Funeral from the home of his parents, 406 Dixon street this afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment in Jewish cemetery.
  • 1/22:  “Mrs. L.S. Cohen, of Margaret street Munhall, who has been ill, is improving rapidly.”
  • 2/4:  “Meyer Grinberg of East Twelfth avenue is numbered among the sick…Miss Rose Heltz (Hertz?) is confined to her home with a cold.”  (For context, the flu started coming back in late January.)
  • 2/5:  “Mrs. Kahn of 135 Eighth avenue is on the sick list. Mr. Joseph Port of Fifth avenue is ill with the grip…Mrs. R. Schermer, of 518 Eighth avenue, who has been confined to the West Penn Hospital for several weeks, is expected to return to her home on Sunday.”
  • 2/6:  “Mr. H. Glick of Thirteenth avenue, Homestead, is on the sick list.”
  • 2/7:   “Robert Davidson of 239 East 8th avenue and his son Harry, after a short illness are recovering…Miss S. Goldman, of Third avenue, is reported on the sick list…M.L. Kohn of 510 East Eighth avenue, who has been on the sick list is greatly improved.”
  • 2/9:  “Dr. and Mrs. Reiter of 613 Ninth avenue, is confined to her home, suffering with a slight illness.”
  • 2/10:  “Mrs. H.L. Little, of Beechfield avenue, Squirrel Hill proprietor of Little’s shoe store, is reported on the sick list.”  2/28:  “Mrs. H. Little, of Squirrel Hill, who has been on the sick list is improving.”
  • 2/11: “Miss Rachel Grinberg, 13, daughter of Meyer I. Grinberg, a well known business man of Eighth avenue, died at 9:30 o’clock last night at the family residence, 335 East Twelfth avenue.  She became ill on Sunday night with a cold which developed into pneumonia, the cause of her death.  She was a pupil in the Homestead High School and was popular with her class mates.  She attended the Hebrew Sunday school and was an active worker in the Girl Scouts of which she was a member.  She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer I. Grinberg; three brothers, Bernard, Ralph and Allen, and one sister, Miss Hilda Grinberg, all at home.  Funeral services were held at the residence of the parents, 335 East Twelfth avenue, at 4 o’clock this afternoon.  Interment in the Jewish cemetery, Homeville.”
  • 2/13:  “Charles Harry Hertz, aged 10 years, died yesterday afternoon at 2:30 at the home of his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hertz, 540 Dickson street.  Funeral this afternoon at 2:00 o’clock.  Interment in Jewish cemetery, Homeville.  He is survived by his father.”
  • 2/14:  “Ben Mervis, aged 31 years, died last night at 8:05 o’clock at the Braddock Hospital where he was taken several days ago.  He is survived by two brothers, Moris Mervis, of Homestead Manuel R. Mervis, Starford, Pa., two sisters Mrs. M. Mervis, Homestead and Mrs. G. Pearlman, Munhall.  Funeral from his late home, 140 W. 11th avenue, tomorrow afternoon at 2 p.m. Interment in the Jewish cemetery, Homeville.”
  • 2/20:  “Max Moss, who has been in the West Penn Hospital for three weeks has returned to his home where he is reported much improved.”
  • 2/26:  “Mr. Morris Goldman of Third avenue who has been seriously ill, reported for work this morning.”
  • 3/10:  Dueling articles…?  “At 2:30 this afternoon a fire was discovered in the basement of Fogel’s candy shop at 315 East Eighth avenue.  The fire department was almost immediately on the job following the alarm and quickly had the flames under control with little loss.”  3/11:  “About 75 persons were driven out of the Elite Theatre and the occupants of the apartment on the second floor of the building by smoke when fire was discovered in Samuel Fogel‘s confectionary store, 317  East Eighth avenue shortly after 2 o’cclock yesterday afternoon.  In a few minutes clouds of smoke issued from the building and filled the avenue…[A passerby] ran into the store and noticed an electric wire short circuted (sic) and a blaze issuing from the stairway leading to the basement.  The firemen soon had a line of hose on the blaze…Chief C.K. Bryce and his firemen soon had the blaze under control.  After the firemen returned to the station house they were recalled as a blaze broke out in the building but was quickly extinguished.  Samuel Fogel’s store was badly gutted and his stock ruined.  He estimates the loss at $3000.  He carried only $100.”  The rest of the article describes the effects of the fire on the theatre and the tenants above.
  • 3/10:  Isidor Winkler, the son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. N. Eskovitz, a prominent business man of Gary, Ind., and a former resident of Homestead, died.  He was quite active in Jewish life there.  Mrs. Winkler and her sons, Norman and Harold, planned to return to Homestead to live with her parents.
  • 3/23:  “Jacob Little, proprietor of the Victor Shoe company, is reported on the sick list.”
  • 3/31/1920

    3/31/1920

    3/27:  “Jacob Little, aged 50, proprietor of the Victor Shoe store on Eighth avenue, Homestead, and brother of Ben Little, a well known shoe merchant, and the late H.L. Little, died…He was at his store on Eighth avenue early this week.  A few days ago he became ill…Mr. Little was a pioneer business man of this place and his genial disposition won him friends by the score…”  Full obituary here.

  • 3/29:  “A number of business men attended the funeral of Jacob Little, a well known shoe merchant of Eighth avenue, which was held from the family residence 6369 Forward avenue, Squirrel Hill, Pittsburg, at 12:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.  Interment was private.  He is survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters.”
  • 4/10:  “Mrs. Feinberg, of 212 Eighth avenue, who has been on the sick list, is able to be around again.”
  • 4/12:  “Jewelry, fur coat and silk shirts valued at $1,000 was the loot of robbers who ransacked the resident of J.W. Gross, 101 West Eleventh avenue, during the family absence last evening.”  The full details of the robbery are here.  This was a rare case where the paper followed up with the resolution to the crime!  12/17:  Joseph Walter “slick burglar caught in Pittsburgh…confessed some of his stunts in Homestead.  Walter told how he entered the home of Jack Gross on the third floor of an apartment at 101 East Eleventh avenue.  There he stole a fur coat worth $500.  Walters used the telephone as a means of finding who should fall his victim.  In the case of Gross, on the second time he telephoned he received no answer and he then visited and ransacked the place during Gross’ absence.  Walters always used the telephone to locate houses unoccupied…Hundreds of people are calling at police headquarters in the city in an effort to identify some of the stolen property.  If you have been robbed in the last few months it might be a good idea to call and the chances are you will locate whatever was stolen.”
  • 4/17:   “I. Lincoff, the jeweler of Eighth avenue, is able to be out again after being confined to his home or the past week with grip.”
  • 4/20:  Julius Sirvan, brother-in-law of Mrs. Morris Grinberg, died at his home in Pittsburgh.  A short obit ran.
  • 4/28:  “The will of Jacob Little, Homestead merchant who died recently, disposes of an estate valued at $25,000.  He left $100 each to the Jewish Home for the Aged and the Homestead Hospital and to the congregation which he attended.  A legacy of $500 was made to Alex Little, his brother, and $2,000 to his son, Hyman Little.  The balance of his estate was left to his widow.  The will was filed for probate yesterday.”
  • 5/22:  A sad story — a girl going by Virginia Tennant, “one of the famous ‘Mystery Girls’ who were detained for three days in the Pittsburg Police station” appeared to Harry Szeinbach, “an insurance man of 540 Fourth avenue” as his daughter Celia, who disappeared in 1918.  5/25:  But the identities of the girls were confirmed, and neither one was Celia.
  • 6/23:  “Miss Birdie Weis of Fourteenth avenue is on the sick list.”
  • 7/29:  “Howard Jacobson of 206 Ann street was arrested by Acting Captain of Police, George Caldwell on the charge of disorderly conduct was given a severe lecture by Acting Burgess Richard Moon at the hearing last night and fined $10 and costs.  It was said the young man was strong on the use of profanity and failed realize how annoying he was to citizens.”
  • 8/2:  “Held up at the point of gun by a masked robber, Miss Sadie Klein of Duquesne and a clerk in the H.L. Little shoe store on Eighth avenue, was robbed of her pay and some change at 10.30 o’clock Saturday night in the Schuchman apartments, Sixth avenue and Amity street.  After the Little shoe store closed on Saturday night Miss Klein decided to call on her sister, Mrs. David Lebov who occupies a second floor apartment in the Schuchman apartments…”  Full story in the dramatic article.
  • 8/23:  “Dorothy Goldman of Third avenue, is reported on the sick list.”
  • 10/4/1920

    10/4/1920

    10/2: “S. Grinberg, aged 85, beloved father of Morris and Meyer Grinberg, prominent business men of this town, died after one day’s illness at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. Viess, at Glassport, Pa.  Prior to his living in Glassport he was a resident of Homestead for over 25 years, and was very well known here.  He is survived by four sons, Morris and Meyer, of Homestead; Solomon, of McKeesport, and Henry, of Pittsburg.  Also two daughters, Mrs. M. Viess, of Glassport, and Mrs. J. Miller, of Turtle Creek.  Funeral will be held Sunday.”  The sons closed their stores for a day as a sign of mourning.

  • 11/5:  “Sam Colman of the Nifty Shoppe, who has been on the sick list for some time past with a severe cold, is reported as being somewhat improved this morning.  Nick Friedman formerly connected with the clothing department of Kaufmann’s Big Store, has accepted a position with the Nifty Shoppe of Homestead.”
  • 11/11:  “Jack Lewin of this place is reported on the sick list.”
  • 12/4:  “Mrs. Ethel Klein, aged 70 years, died Friday morning at 11:45 a.m. after a long illness at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A.L. Hepps, Munhall, Pa.  Mrs. Klein was formerly of New York, but has been a resident of Homestead for the past 18 years.  She was a member of the Rodelf (sic) Shalom congregation, Hebrew Ladies’ Aid society, Jewish Home for Babies, and the Home for the Aged in Pittsburgh.  Mrs. Klein was well known in Homestead and is survived by a host of friends; also one sister, Mrs. Mary Moss of Glenwood and five daughters, Mrs. A.L. Hepps of Homestead, Mrs. J.F. Klein of Oakmont; Mrs. S.B. Klein of Elizabeth, N.J.; Mrs. M. Irwin of Donora, Pa., and Mrs. A. Steiner of Pittsburgh.  Funeral services will be held Sunday morning at 10 a.m. from her residence, 428 Ninth avenue, Munhall.”

Travel & Socializing

  • 1/2:  “Isador Lasday has left for Boston, Mass., where he will attend the convention of the Sigma Alpha Nu Fraternity. Before returning to resume his studies in the University of Pittsburg early in January, he will visit New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.”
  • 1/9:  “Mrs. Kahn of Kahn’s specialty shop has returned from a trip to Atlantic City, Philadelphia and New York which was a combination pleasure and buying trip of early spring goods.  While in Atlantic City Mrs. Kahn attended the silver wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fishman, formerly of Homestead, at the Ocean Spray Hotel.  There were many prominent speakers present from Eastern cities and during the evening a large fund was raised for the Jewish War sufferers.  Mrs. Kahn and Mr. Chorney, the toastmaster of the evening, led the Grand Math.  In Philadelphia Mrs. Kahn attended the Archer Theatre, where she met Miss Dora Weisman, leading lady, who promised to come to Homestead and give her services for a benefit to be given by the Jewish Ladies Aid Society.”
  • 1/19:  “Mr. and Mrs Sam Glick spent yesterday in Wilkinsburg… Mr. and Mrs. Julius Friedlander of Beaver Falls, spent the week end with friends in Homestead.”
  • 1/31:  “Misses Jennie and Regina Markowitz of Munhall have left for Akron, Ohio, where they will attend the wedding of Miss Belle Wiener, formerly of Homestead.”
  • 2/4:  “Miss Dorothy Gordon, of Pittsburg, spent Monday evening with Miss Sadie Siegle, of Homestead. Jack Siegle, Jack Fogel and Robert Hilk attended a basket ball game played by the Coffey Club of Pittsburg…Mr. and Mrs. Morris Grinberg and daughter, Ruth, of Twelfth avenue, attended the wedding of Mrs. Grinberg’s niece, Miss Leah Sirven, of Robenson (sic?) street, Oakland, to Mr. Simon Miller, of Baltimore.”
  • 2/5:  “Mrs. Louis Freeman of Eighth avenue has gone to visit friends in Johnstown for a few days…Mr. Dave Klein and sister, Miss Helen Klein, from New York, arrived today to spend a few weeks with their aunt and uncle, Mrs and Mrs. A. Hepps of Ninth avenue, Munhall. Dr. and Mrs. D. Reiter of 613 Eighth avenue, Homestead, have left for a short trip to Philadelphia and New York and are expected to return home Monday.”
  • 2/6:  “Mrs. M. Mallinger of McClure street, Homestead, is visiting her sick brother-in-law, Mr. Siser of Milwaukie street Pittsburg.”
  • 2/9:  “Miss Helen Gluck of First avenue, was a social caller in Duquesne yesterday afternoon.”
  • 2/12:  “W. Reuben, of New York City, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Lasdusky, who returned from New York this morning after a buying trip.”
  • 2/14:  “Mrs. Gluck, of 301 East Eighth avenue, was a business caller in Homestead Park, yesterday.”
  • 2/18:  “Miss Fannie Friedlander of Clarksburg is visiting Mr. and Mrs. M. Friedlander of Eleventh avenue, Munhall…Miss Silverstein of Rankin, who has just gone under an operation at the Homestead Hospital is visiting Rev. S. Widom for a few days.”
  • 2/19:  “Dr. Irwin Lasday, of University of Pittsburg, spent the week end in Homestead. Arthur Grossman, a prominent young attorney, of Pittsburg, was a visitor in Homestead yesterday.”
  • 2/24:  “Louis Lasday, of Pittsburg, was a visitor in town yesterday.”
  • 2/26:  “Miss Dorothy Goldman and her sister, Mrs. M.L. Kohn, of Munhall attended a theatre party yesterday afternoon at the Alvin.”
  • 3/1:  “Miss Anna Gross, of Half Bros. has returned from a trip to Detroit, where she has been staying for the past three weeks with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. A. and Mrs. Henry Pepper.”
  • 3/15:  “Mr. and Mrs. Glick, of Whitaker, visited friends in Homestead yesterday.”
  • 3/20:  “Isadore Glick, of Glick’s store on Whitaker street, was a Pittsburg visitor yesterday.”
  • 3/22:  “Mr. and Mrs. I. Lincoff have returned home from a week’s visit with Mrs. Lincoff’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ekker of Sharon, Pa.”
  • 3/31:  “Mrs. E. M. Feinberg, of 212 Eighth avenue, is a visitor in Pittsburg today.”
  • 4/5:  “Morris Mervis, Aaron Pearlman and Edward Donahoe of Homestead are visiting at Sarfford, Pa.”
  • 4/5: “Miss Thelma Friedman who is attending the Western Reserve, is spending her Easter vacation with her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. H. Feldman, of Ann street.”
  • 4/5: “A small gathering was held at the home of Miss Frances Friedlander of Eleventh avenue, Saturday evening. Among those present were Helen Schermer, Ruth Moss, Sadie Hepps, Mollie Mervis, Sadie Lefkowitz and Sarah Jacobson.”
  • 4/9:  “Mr. and Mrs. B. Friedlander, of Eighth avenue, were visitors in Pittsburgh last evening.”
  • 4/10:  “Mr. and Mrs. Henry Little and family, formerly of Bellwood, moved to their new home in Burgettstown on Tuesday. Their daughter, Miss Sarah Little, employed at the H.L. Little Shoe store, is spending a few days with her parents…Mrs. H.L. Little, of Squirrel Hill, left last evening for a visit with her parents in Baltimore.”
  • 4/17:  “Miss Taube Silverman, of Baltimore, Md. is visiting her sister, Mrs. H.L. Little, proprietress of the H.L. Little Shoe store.”
  • 4/20:  “Miss Rose Glick, of Eleventh avenue, left for McKeesport Saturday, where she will spend a few days with relatives.”
  • 4/28:  “Miss Charlotte Goldman, of Third avenue, was calling on friends out of town last evening.”
  • 4/30:  “Mr. Maurice Steinberg of Eighth avenue is leaving today for New York on a business trip and while there he will visit his parents.”  5/7:  “Maurice Steinberg of Eighth avenue, arrived home last evening after a week’s visit with his parents in New York.”
  • 5/12:  “Morris Markley of Subury is visiting at the home of H.S. Schwartz, of Ninth avenue.”
  • 6/4:  “Miss Charlotte Goldman, of Third avenue, was an out of town visitor yesterday. Miss Eva Little, of Homestead, will leave today for Eldersville, where she will spend the summer. Miss Little was one of the Homestead High school class, ’20. After the vacation she will attend college in the East.”
  • 6/7:  “Miss Birdie Weis, of 14th avenue, spent the weekend with relatives in Edgewood….Mrs. M. Seigel and daughter Sadie, of Homestead, were out of town visitors yesterday.”
  • 6/9:  “Harris Silverman, of Baltimore, Md., is visiting at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H.L. LittleMr. and Mrs. S. Mervis and family of Ninth avenue, have motored to Cincinnati, Ohio to attend their daughter’s first wedding anniversary.”  6/14: “Harris Silverman left last evening for Baltimore after spending two weeks with his daughter, Mrs. Celia Little, of Squirrel Hill.”
  • 6/9:  “Mrs. Clara Segelman, of Forbes street, Squirrel Hill formerly of Eighth avenue, Homestead, will leave for Chicago in the near future where she will make her home with her son, Louis Segelman, who is well established in that city. … Ben Little, D.C. Addie, Edward Lowenstein and Max Seigel, went on an excursion trip to Cleveland Sunday. Mr. Seigel was robbed of his pocketbook by pickpockets at the Pennsylvania station….Samuel Hepps, of Hirth pharmacy, was an out of town visitor last evening….Misses Jean and Gertrude Friedlander of Eleventh avenue attended the graduating exercises at the University of Pittsburgh this morning…Mrs. Wm. H. Seigal held a stag dinner for her husband and his friends at her home on Meadow street, East Liberty last evening.”
  • 6/10:  “Miss Sarah Markowitz, of Eleventh avenue, Munhall, is spending a few weeks with her sister in Washington, Pa….Al Gross returned home last evening from Cleveland. Mr. Gross made the trip in his machine and reports the roads in good condition.”
  • 6/24:  “Miss Ethel Lichter of Charleroi is the house guest of Miss Francis Friedlander of Eleventh avenue.”
  • 6/28:  “Miss Sadie Seigal was a Mt. Pleasant visitor on Sunday… Miss Gertrude Friedlander attended a luncheon Saturday afternoon, given by the Nu Chapter of the Alph Epsilon Phi Sorority of the University of Pittsburg.”
  • 6/29:  “Al Gross called up yesterday from Cleveland and said he had arrived OK and was leaving last night for Kentucky. Mr Gross is making the trip in his car and expects to be gone about two weeks.”
  • 7/7:  “S.S. Mervis and R. Davidson have left for New York and Atlantic City where they will spend a few weeks… Jack Gross returned last evening after visiting friends at Youngstown and Conneaut.”
  • 7/14:  “Morris Mervis, of Eighth avenue garage motored to Starford, Pa. Mrs. D. Rabinowitz and son, of Philadelphia, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ben Friedlander of Eleventh avenue.”
  • 7/16:  “Mrs. I.S. Grossman accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Amshell, of Braddock, left for Mt. Clemens, Mich., last night.”
  • 7/20:  “Miss Rose Ecker of New York City is visiting her sister Mrs. I. Grossman of 524 Ninth avenue, Munhall… Mrs. I. Grossman of Ninth avenue, Munhall entertained at cards on Sunday evening in honor of her house guest Miss Rose Ecker of New York City. About thirty guests were present.”
  • 7/22:  “Leo L. Half one of the popular members of the firm of Half Brothers accompanied by his family arrived home from a few weeks vacation spent at The St. Elves, Chautauqua, N.Y. He reports a very delightful time and his face is all aglow with smiles when he tells of his enjoyable vacation spent in the delightful resort in New York State…Jack Gross, manager and owner of the Nifty Shoppe will leave Saturday night for Atlantic City for a two weeks’ vacation after while Mr. Gross will go to Philadelphia and New York and purchase his winter stock.”
  • 7/23:  “Miss Rose Klein of New York City has arrived here to visit her cousin, Mrs. Dave Lebov of Amity street.  Mr. Lew Silverman of Baltimore is here on a business trip and is visiting his sister Mrs. H.L. Little of Squirrel Hill.”  8/5:  “Miss Rose Klein of New York City has returned home after visiting relatives in Homestead.”
  • 7/24:  “Marian Steinberger of Half Bros. is spending his vacation at Conneaut Lake…Lewis L. Lasday, manager of Lasdusky’s big store, and his wife left yesterday on a touring trip to New York, accompanied by his cousins, Mr. Arnold Reuben and his two sons, of the famous Ruben Pure Food Shop, of New York, who were visiting their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lasdusky, of 5826 Douglass street, Pittsburgh. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Lasday after visiting relatives in New York will spend 10 days at Nantucket Beach, Mass. and some time in Boston visiting relatives. On their homeward bound journey Mr. Lasday will stop off at New York and Philadelphia and purchase an advanced fall sample line of ladies’ wearing apparel, and see of the latest designs of advanced fall millinery.”  8/10:  “Louis Lasday and wife have returned from the East where they spent their vacation.”
  • 7/26:  “Miss Hilda Grinberg is spending her vacation on a farm with her aunt Mrs. William Harrison of Oakland.”  8/24:  “Miss Hilda Grinberg has returned from Waynesburg where she spent a six week’s vacation.”
  • 7/28:  “Mr. and Mrs. Gross of Beechwood boulevard entertained last night in honor of Mrs. Applebaum and her two daughters form Houston, Texas.”
  • 8/4:  “Miss Rose Glick of Ninth avenue, Munhall has returned home after a four weeks visit in Canada. Mr. M. J. Haupt of Dixon street has left for an extended trip through the East.  Miss Regina Haupt of Dixon street is visiting at Cleveland Ohio, Detroit and Mt. Clemens, Mich., and North Girard Pa.”
  • 8/5:  “Harry and Isadore Lasday left yesterday for Camp Homestead, Girard, where they will spend two weeks…Mr. Kahn of Kahn’s Specialty Shop accompanied by his children are spending their vacation at Signal, Ohio… Mrs. Albert Freedman is home from a few weeks’ visit to Atlantic City, N.J.”  8/7:  “Mr. and Mrs. Kahn and children of the Kahn Specialty Shop have returned from Ohio where they visited for several weeks.”
  • 8/7:  “Mrs. Little and family of Little’s Shoe Store left for a trip to Asbury, N.Y. to spend their vacation.”
  • 8/12:  “Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Grinstein of Margaret street are spending their vacation at Mt. Clements, Mich.  Ben Little the shoe dealer of Eighth avenue, has returned from a motoring trip to Jamestown, N.Y. and other points along Lake Erie.”
  • 8/16:  “Paul Numorosky, Charles and Harry Mervis visited Margolis yesterday at the Pittsburgh hospital. Morris Bichler, formerly of this place, but now of Washington county, spent yesterday visiting with friends here.”
  • 8/17:  “Mrs. Morris Grinberg and daughter Ruth, of Munhall, have returned home from a two weeks trip to New York and Atlantic City.”
  • 8/20:  “Attorney Arthur M. Grossman has returned home from Erie and Conneaut Lake. While away he spent some time with the Boy Scouts at North Girard…Reverend S. Widom, of the Homestead Hebrew congregation, left this morning with his wife for Cambridge Springs where they will spend the next two weeks.”
  • 8/24:  “Meyer Grinberg left for Cambridge Springs where he is spending his vacation…Joseph Lasdusky, of Homestead, is spending his vacation in New York City.”
  • 8/25:  “Mrs. H. L. Little, accompanied by her son Merrill, and sister, Taube Silverman, of Baltimore, Md., have returned from their vacation which was spent in Asbury Park, New Jersey, and New York… Morris Grinberg, a well known business man of Eighth avenue and son Leonard, have left for Cambridge Springs where they will spend a week.”
  • 8/28:  “Miss Jean Friedlander of Eleventh avenue has just returned home after a few weeks vacation.”
  • 9/3:  “B. Friedlander, a business man of Eighth avenue and wife have returned from a visit to New York City.”
  • 9/7:  “Miss Lillian Friedlan (sic?) of New Castle is visiting the Misses Jean and Gertrude Friedlander of Eleventh avenue. Mr. and Mrs. B. Friedlander have returned home from an extended purchasing trip through the eastern cities.”
  • 9/16:  “Harry D. Margolis of H.L. Little’s shoe store was an out of town visitor yesterday. Miss Sarah Little of H.L. Little’s shoe store has returned to her duties after visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Little of Burgettstown, Pa.”
  • 9/23: “Miss Ida Frieldander of Friedlander’s department store was a visitor in Pittsburgh this afternoon.”
  • 10/2:  “Al Gross of the Nifty Shoppe left for Chicago today.”  10/4:  “Mr. Gross and Mr. Colmon (sic?) of the Nifty Shop have gone to Chicago and from there they are going to New York to purchase some winter wear for the Nifty Shoppe.”
  • 10/6:  “Louis Goldie, of Baltimore, Maryland, is visiting his sister-in-law, Mrs. Celia Little, of Squireel Hill. While here Mr. Goldie will visit many of the glass centers in Pennsylvania and he has already placed the manufacture of a patent autombile lens in the hands of the United Glass company of Pittsburg. He will leave for his home this Sunday evening…Miss Mamie Mervis, of Eighth avenue, was an out-of-town visitor last evening.”
  • 10/9:  “The Aunt and Uncle of Mr. Gross of Gross’ department store are visiting Mr. Gross. They will remain in Homestead for a few days after which they will leave for New York where they will board a ship for England.”
  • 10/19:  James Glick‘s Sunday School class, chaperoned by their teacher Miss Birdie Weis, came to a Hallowe’en party in his honor.  (Unclear why — he was born in April.)  His aunt Mrs. Hertz, her sister Rose Hertz, Mrs. Hepner, and Harriett Greenstein entertained.  Mrs. Sam Glick, his mother, aided by her sisters, Rose and Sadie, served luncheon.  Read the article for the description of all the Hallowe’en fun they had.
  • 11/5:  “Lee Schwartz, formerly of Turtle Creek, and manager of Grinberg’s Department store is now residing in Homestead. Mrs. Celia Little of Homestead, and sister, Miss Taube Silverman, of Baltimore, Md., returned from Cambridge Springs yesterday after spending several weeks there.”
  • 11/8:  “M. Sneidman of Newport News, Virginia, is visiting his sister-in-law, Mrs. H.L. Little of Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh.”
  • 11/11:  Miss Rebecca Goldfarb was visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Friedlander of Eleventh avenue over the week end…Mr. Marlow of Philadelphia was was visiting at H.L. Little’s shoe store yesterday afternoon. Miss Sarah Little of H.L. Little’s shoe store was an out of town visitor yesterday.”
  • 12/1:  “Louis Silverman of Baltimore, Maryland, has returned home after visiting his sister, Mrs. H.L. Little of Squirrel Hill, proprietor of H.L. Little’s shoe store.”
  • 12/13:  “Leo Half, of Half Bros., leaves tonight for Chicago to attend the anniversary celebration of his mother’s eighth birthday.  His mother, Mrs. Eva Half resides with a daughter, Mrs. S. Newman and is in good health.  Mr. Half will return later in the week.”
  • 12/20:  “L.D. Moss, from Homestead, was a visitor on December 10 at the big exhibit of Southern California products maintained free to the public in the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. He also attended the lectures and motion pictures that are a part of the daily program.  The exhibit is the largest of any in the country maintained by a commercial organization.  Before returning home, Mr. Moss expects to visit several of the many other places of interest in the Southland.”
  • 12/31:  “One man was slightly injured at 6 o’clock last evening when the automobile of Dr. M.H. Moss and Fred Schuchman collided at Eighth avenue and Ann street.  In the accident Dr. Moss had his right arm injured, but not seriously and is able to be around this morning…When Dr. Moss saw the possibility of an accident he turned his car to the left and Schuchman turned to the right but the turn was too short and [Schuchman’s] big Buick car caught the front of [Moss’] Ford Coupe and carried it to the curb, damaging the front of the car and both front wheels.”
  • 12/31:  “Mr. and Mrs. M.D. Weis of 324 East Ninth avenue will be at home on Sunday afternoon and evening of January 2, in honor of Miss Sylvia Stern of Cleveland. No cards. Mrs. H.L. Little left this morning for Baltimore, Maryland, to spend the new year with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Silverman of that place.”

Simchas

  • 2/5:  “Mrs. I. Grossman, formerly of 8th avenue, Munhall, has moved to her new home at Ninth avenue, Munhall.”
  • 2/9:  “Mr. and Mrs. H. Feldman, secretary of the Ladies Hebrew Aid Society, are rejoicing over the arrival of a baby girl.”
  • 2/20:  In a special automobile section, there was a list of people who own Buicks, including Leo Half, furniture dealer; Jos. Lasdusky, clothing merchant; Morris Grinberg, dry goods merchant; and Isaac Lincoff, jeweler.”
  • 3/25:  “Joseph Friedlander, son of Mr. and Mrs. L.A. Friedlander of East Third avenue, and Miss Gertrude Kreger of Greensburg, Pa. were married last Sunday evening by Rabbi A.M. Askinsky in the presence of the immediate families.  After a short trip through the East Mr. and Mrs. Friedlander will be at home at 241 East Eighth avenue.  Mr. Friedlander is a member of the firm of Friedlander Bros. and the Model Bakery.”
  • 3/30: “A reception was held by Mr. and Mrs. Morris Grinberg, Sunday evening, in honor of their son, Leonard, who was confirmed Sunday afternoon…Those who aided in serving were Misses Ruth Grinberg, Sadie Seigel, Rose Glick, Ida Videll and Anna Grinberg of Homestead…”  Full description of the festivities here.
  • 5/11:  Mr. and Mrs. B. Friedlander entertained Sunday afternoon in honor of their son Gerson‘s ninth birthday.  Thirty little guests were present.  The afternoon’s pastimes were games and music.  At 5 o’clock a dainty lunch was served by the hostess, assisted by her daughter.  The favors were miniature birds.”
  • 5/26:  “Mr. and Mrs. Max Adlersburg announce the arrival of a baby girl last evening. Mother and baby are doing nicely.”
  • 5/29:  “Mrs. Little of the H.L. Little Shoe company has received a new Paige sedan car purchased from the local Paige Co.”
  • 6/23:  “Mr. and Mrs. B. Friedlander celebrated their twenty-first wedding anniversary on Sunday, June 20. They were presented with a beautiful gift by their children.”
  • 7/30:  “Rabbi J. Max Weis of Gary, Indiana, has been called to the Free Syangogue of New York City, to become its Associate Rabbi with Doctor Stephen S. Weis…Rabbi Weis has been minister of Temple Israel at Gary since 1918…Rabbi Weis is a graduate of Homestead High School…class of 1909.  His further studies were pursued at the Hebrew Union College of College,” University of Cincinnati, University of Chiacgo, and Columbia University.  “Rabbi Weis will spend a few days at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris D. Weis, on his way to New York during the latter part of August.”  His full bio here.
  • 8/2:  “Ben Pearlman has just received a new Mitchell car. He purchased it through the local representative, the Eighth Avenue Garage.”
  • 8/23:  “Born, to Mr. and Mrs. I. Lincoff, of Eleventh avenue, Aug. 22, a baby boy. Mother and son who are in the Braddock hospital, are doing nicely.”
  • 9/29:  “Mr. and Mrs. H. Samuel (sic) formerly of Homestead now of East Liberty are rejoicing are the arrival of a baby girl last evening at their home. The baby weights ten and one half pounds. Mother and baby are doing nicely.”
  • 10/12:  “Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. Gordon of California, Pa., a son. Mrs. Gordon will be remembered as Miss Jennie Leboowitz and formerly as a school teacher of the Homestead public school.”
  • 11/1:  “Yesterday afternoon, Miss Lena Lebovitz, daughter of Mrs. Fannie Lebovitz of Ammon street, became the bride of Isadore Klein of California, Pa.  The ceremony has performed by Rev. Widom of the local synagogue.  A dinner and a reception followed the wedding.  Over 500 guests were present.  After a wedding trip the young couple will make their home at California, Pa., where Mr. Klein is engaged in business.”
  • 11/23:  “A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Glick of Whitaker, in Homestead hospital Monday morning.  The visitor tips the scales at seven pounds and the mother and daughter are reported to be doing well.”  This was Martha, the first of their three girls.
  • 11/23:  “Mr. and Mrs. Grossman of Eighth avenue, attended the Golden wedding which was held by Mr. and Mrs. E. Janowitz of McKeesport, in the Masonic Temple on Sunday evening, November 21.”
  • 12/20:  “Miss Sadye Siegel, daughter of Mrs. Mary Tobie Siegel of Homestead, was married yesterday at her home here to Harry Green of Brownsville, Pa.  Miss Siegel is well known here and her friends wish her much joy in her married life.  Mr. Green conducts a grocery and butcher store in Brownsville.  The couple left last evening for Youngstown where they will visit before they go to Brownsville where they will make their future home.”
  • 12/30: “Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Wolk are the proud parents of a baby girl which arrived yesterday. As one friend of Mr. Wolk put it, ‘It’s as nice a little girl as ever shook a fist under a father’s nose.'”

Community

  • 1/17:  “The Hebrew Ladies Aid Society held a regular meeting Tuesday, Jan. 13, 1920, at the Synagogue on Tenth avenue.  The following officers were unanimously elected for the next term Mrs. Joseph Lasdusky, re-elected president; Mrs. Alex Hepps, reelected vice president; Mrs. B. Gluck, re-elected treasurer, and Mrs. Lawrence A. Metz, secretary…Mrs. H.S. Shwartz was awarded a pin bearing the initials H.L.A.S. as a prize for winning the membership campaign.”  The article, below, reported on the past year’s activities.  “This organization is affiliated with almost every Hebrew Charitable Organization in the United States.  It is to this society that the Sabbath School children owe their annual holiday treats and lunch at their annual picnic.”
  • 2/5: “The Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Homestead will give a euchre and whist party on Wednesday, February 11, in the Realty hall.  Beautiful prizes have been secured for the occasion.  The committee consists of Mrs. Hepner, Mrs. Greenstein and Mrs. I. Grossman.”
  • 2/6:  “The Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Homestead will hold a whist and euchre party on Wednesday evening, Feb 11, at 8 p.m. in the Realty hall, Eighth and Amity streets, for the benefit of a poor family.  The affair is in charge of Mrs. A.E. Hepner, chairman; Mrs. B.J. Swartz, Mrs. I. Grossman and Mrs. E. Greenstein.  Every body welcome.”
  • 2/12:  “The I.O.B.B. No. 586 of Homestead cordially invites the public to be present at their annual rally, Feb. 15, at Homestead Savings Bank hall.  The meeting will open promptly at 8:15 p.m.  Delegations will be present from all the sister lodges in the district.  Prominent speakers and live wire members of neighboring cities will contribute their efforts toward making this affair the largest and best ever staged by Homestead I.O.B.B.  The public is urged to come early as a hall taxed to its capacity is expected.  Come.  Come early.  Come with a friend.”
  • 2/17:  “Under the auspices of the newly reorganized Homestead Zion District a very important meeting will be held at the synagogue on Thursday, Feb. 19, at 8 o’clock p.m.  Speakers of prominence will address the audience on the question of Jewish Renaissance.  We urge every Jew and Jewess to come and bring their friends.  All members who may by accident not have received a card are urgently requested to attend as matters of importance will be discussed.  By order of President J. Lasdusky.  Recording Secretary, J. Lazar.”
  • 2/19:  “A Zionish (sic) meeting will be held at the synagogue on Tenth avenue and McClure street tonight.  A number of prominent speakers will be present and a large crowd is expected to be present.”
  • 2/20:  “A.J. Kahn, of New York City, a noted Jewish speaker, gave an interesting address in the Synagogue, Tenth avenue, last evening.  There was a fine attendance.  The meeting was that of the Zionist (sic) of this district and Mr. Kahn’s subject was Zionist Restoration.  Much interest was shown in his talk and it is predicted that in the near future Homestead will have one of the largest and best Zionest (sic) societies in Western Pennsylvania.  Arrangements were made for another meeting Sunday, Feb. 29.  It was decided also to postpone the campaign for the restoration fund from March 7 to some date in April when it is expected that Homestead as usual will go over the top.”
  • 2/24:  “Miss Wise, Sunday school teacher of the Hebrew Sunday school class, gave a party at her home, on 14th avenue, last evening.  Nineteen attended, 14 of the Sunday school class and five honor guests.  A most enjoyable time was spent in music and games and all helped make the party a delightful affair.”
  • 2/26:  “Mrs. J. Lasday, of 5826 Douglass avenue, Squirrel Hill gave a whist part at her home last evening for the benefit of the Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Homestead.  The winners of the prizes were as follows:  First prize, Mrs. Friedlander, of Homestead; Second prize, Mrs. Schmitt, of Pittsburg; Third prize, Mrs. A. Weiss, of Homestead.  There was an exceptionally large attendance and an enjoyable evening was spent.  Luncheon was served at a late hour.”
  • 3/3:  “The Homestead Zion District is arranging a Purim Festival to take place on Sunday March 7th at the Rodef Sholem Temple Ninth avenue (sic), Homestead, at 8 p.m.  The Festival this year is of more than ordinary interest to the Jewish people as it comemorates (sic) the release of the Nation from the Bablonian (sic) captivity and strengthens their expectation for the re-establishing of the Jewish Homeland in Palestine.  The program of the affair will be announced later and are all invited to attend.  Admission free.  J. LASDUSKY, Pres.  B. LAZAR, Sec.”
  • 3/9:  “Mrs. Vaximan (sic), president of the Zionist Society of Pittsburgh was the principal speaker at a meeting held in the Synagogue on Sunday night.  She is connected with the Haduak (sic?) Chapter of Pittsburg and twenty five new members were enlisted in the work of the Jews to take possession of Palestine now, as the Turks have have been eliminated.  Julius Liverson, of Pittsburg was present and delivered and interesting talk and urged all to be connected with the Zionist movement.  At the close of the meeting a luncheon was served by the Ladies Hebrew Aid Society.”
  • 3/12:  “The Confirmation Class of the local Hebrew Religious school will give a very interesting Purim entertainment Sunday evening, March 14, 1920 at 8 o’clock in the Library Music hall.  The teacher, pupils and school committee take this means of extending a very cordial invitation to all.”  The full program is in the article below.
  • 3/22:  “One of the most important and interesting meetings of the Homestead Zion district will take place this evening in the Jewish synagogue on Tenth avenue.  Mr. Meyer Goldberg, of New York, who is with the executive committee of the Zionist Organization of America, will be at the meeting.  He has been a worker for the cause for the past twenty-give years and is known internationally as a writer.  A great treat will be in store for all those who will be fortunate enough to hear this noted guest.  The meeting will be called to order at 8:15 sharp.  Everyone is invited to attend.”
  • 4/3:  “Last night, April began one of the most important Jewish holidays.  All over the world the Jewish people are celebrating the most wonderful festival.” The paper goes on to explain Passover in the article below.  “In Homestead services are being conducted by Rabbi Samuel Widom at the local synagogue on Tenth avenue.”
  • 4/8:  “The Hebrew Ladies Aid Society has arranged to commence a drive on next Tuesday for old clothing which will be sent to the sufferers in the East.  All residents are asked to cooperate and have all old clothes clean and mended.  The Aid Society has arranged for the boy scouts of Troop No. 2 to call at their homes and collect the clothing.”
  • 4/8:  “The members of Rodef Shalom Hebrew congregation will celebrate the last two days of the Passover in the synagogue on Tenth avenue this evening and tomorrow night.  Rabbi Samuel Widom, pastor of the congregation, will be in charge…” A bit of explanation in the remainder of the article below.
  • 4/23:  “Among the great events of the day, partly due to the world war, is the restoration of Palestine to the Jews.  This has been the hope and aim of the Jewish people for 1850 years.  In the last 20 years much has been done by the Jewish people towards acquiring the land…To further this work of restoration of the land…large sums of money are needed…At the present time every community in the United States is busy with this campaign…In the Homestead district the campaign will start this Sunday April 25, when a mass meeting will be held at the Synagogue, when prominent speakers will address the audience.”  Full article below.
  • 4/24:  “Everything seems to be in readiness for the start of the campaign to raise the Homestead quota from the Palestine Restoration Fund.  The leaders Messrs. B. Friedlander, A. Weiss, J. Lasdusky and J. Bernard, who are well known local business men are very confident as to the outcome….This campaign begins on April 25th and ends May 3rd.  There are arrangements made for mass meetings to be held on Sunday, April 25th at the synagogue on Tenth avenue where men of national repute will address the audience.  The meeting will be called at 8 p.m.”  Full article below.
  • 4/27:  “On Sunday, April 25th…the mass meeting held at the synagogue for the purpose of opening the campaign for the Palestine” tok place with speakers from New York and Pittsburgh.  “A collection was taken up and $1000 was subscribed.”  Full article below.
  • 4/30:  “The Palestine fund tag day proved to be a great success.  The people of this community deserve the tanks and appreciation of the entire Jewish nation for the wonderful assistance given.  There was never any doubt about the outcome and the leaders of the Palestine Restoration Fund feel certain that Homestead will exceed its quota.  Almost $2500 have been subscribed.”  The full article below explains that voting began that day at I. Grossman‘s store to select two delegates from the Homestead district to attend the convention in New York on May 9th and 10th.
  • 5/10:  “The Zionist Organization of America has called a special conference to take up the work of restoration of Palestine.  This conference called to meet in New York on May 8th and 9th has for its object the organization o the work and up-building the country and making it ready to receive a large immigration…It is reported that 17000 delegates from all parts of the country are present to take up [the] task.  The Homestead district is represented by Mr. Joseph Lasdusky who left Friday, May 7 for this purpose…”  Full article below.
  • 5/15:  “The Freedom and Victory Celebration being arranged by the Homestead Zion district promises to be one of the best held in this city, the committee in charge has made arrangements to have a very fine program.  Several educational and musical numbers have been arranged as well as lectures.  Refreshments will be served by the Hebrew Ladies Aid Society.  The celebration will take place at the synagogue, on Tenth avenue, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday May 16.  There will be no collections made.”
  • 5/17:  “On Sunday the Homestead Zion District celebrate the re-establishing of Palestine as the Jewish Homestead.  The Synagogue was well crowded and it was the best entertainment ever held by the Jews of Homestead.”  The full article below details the participation of Rev. Widom and choir, Mrs. I. Grossman, Mr. Joseph Lasdusky, and Mr. Bernard.
  • 6/3:  “Many Hebrews from here will take part in the parade to be held in the city on Sunday afternoon by the Jewish citizens of Western Pennsylvania, when they will celebrate the virtual restoration of the Holy Land of the Jews through the British control.  The parade will be from the Zionists Building out Fifth avenue Forbes field where a big mass meeting will be held.”
  • 6/7:  “Miss Jean B. Friedlander entertained her Sunday school class Sunday afternoon at her home, 218 Eleventh avenue, Games and music were the diversions of the afternoon.”
  • 6/9:  “The members of Homestead Lodge No. 586 I.O.B.B. are invited to a joint dinner and smoker of all the I.O.B.B. Lodges of Allegheny County, to be held Wednesday evening, June 9th, at 8 o’clock P.M., Moose Temple, Penn avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa.  This dinner is complimentary and will combine business with pleasure, giving the members of the county and opportunity of getting better acquainted and at the same time discussing questions which are vitally important to the Order.  A big turn out is expected from all parts of the county, and Homestead will be well represented.  Every member of the Homestead Lodge I.O.B.B. is urgently requested to attend the dinner.  Admission free to every member, and every member is permitted to take a friend.”
  • 6/11:  “The Homestead Hebrew Religious School will hold it Confirmation Exercises, Sunday evening, June 13, 1920 at 8:00 P.M. in the Synagogue.  A very interesting programme has been arranged, and the teachers and pupils use this means of extending a cordial invitation to all.”  Program and list of confirmants below.
  • 6/14:  “A very interesting program was carried out last night when 17 pupils of the Homestead Hebrew Religious school were confirmed.  The Synagogue was well filled and beautifully decorated for the occasion with roses and ferns.”  A summary of the evening and the list of prize winners are in the article below.
  • 6/14:  “The members of the Homestead Hebrew Sunday School classes Two and Three gave a surprise party in honor of their teacher Miss Birdie Weis at her home on Fourteenth avenue. Mr. and Mrs. M. Mervis, of Braddock, and Mrs. W. Gordon and daughters, Florence and Sadie and son, Leroy Gordon, attended a receiption at the home of I. Miller, at 241 E. Fifth avenue, following Confirmation exercises at the Synagogue on Tenth avenue.”
  • 6/18:  “The Rev. William M. Woodfin will deliver an address Sunday night at the First Presbyterian church upon the subject of ‘The Hebrew in the Drama of History.’  Mr. Woodfin used this subject as his graduating oration and later developer it into an address.  He gave it some time ago in the east and it was published in the Monday issue of the Brooklyn Eagle and received favorable comment from the press.  A special invitation is extended to the Jews of Homestead and vicinity to hear this message that presents the Jew as the hero in the drama of human history.”  The full address was printed in The Messenger on 7/20.
  • 9/11: “On Monday, September the 13th, the festival of the New Year (Rosh Hashanah) will be oserved by the Jews of the entire world…In the local synagogue Rev. Samuel Widom will conduct services. Special music by a choir will be a feature.” Full article below.
  • 9/18: “September 22nd is observed as Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, by the Jews throughout the world.” The article below, as always, explain the holiday, including the Memorial service. “Especially in times of stress, when many brave men are offering up their lives, fervor animates these prayers.”
  • 9/22: “Today is observed as Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement by the Jews throughout the world.” The article below looks like a copy of the previous one, with the updated conclusion, “Services were held in the local synagogue by Rev. S. Widom. Special music by a choir was a feature.”
  • 10/15: “The Homestead Hebrew Sunday School organization announces the opening of Sunday school here at ten o’clock Sunday morning, October 17th at the synagogue auditorium. A large attendance is expected as a very interesting program for the season has been arranged and capable teachers have been secured. Parents are particularly requested to see that their children are in attendance at the opening day of the Hebrew Sunday school. Those in charge have carefully mapped out a course of training on a plane with best in the country and it is believed that the opening will be the largest in the history of the local sabbath school.”
  • 11/8: “The Hebrew Ladies’ Aid society of Homestead last night observed a most successful celebration of its fifteenth anniversary, over 150 being present to make the occasion one to be long remembered.” A long article detailed the celebrations and the many women and a few men who took part.
  • 12/11:  “The Homestead Hebrew Sunday School will present a little program at the Synagogue, Sunday evening, at 8:30 in celebration of the Holy day Hanukah.”  The program is in the article below.
  • 12/29:  “Under the auspices of Homestead lodge No. 586, Independent Order B’Nai B’Rith a big meeting will be held at the local synagogue Sunday which will be of intense interest to Jewery (sic).  Rabbi A.H. Kahn of the Beth Shalom congregation will discuss the question of ‘Anti-Semitism.'”  The article, below, details the rest of the program, including the connection to the lies spread by Henry Ford.

Community:  Y.M.H.A. and Y.W.H.A.

  • 1/7:  “On January 27 the first of a series of dances will be held by the Y.M.H.A. in the Elks Temple, on Ninth avenue.  It is evident by the advanced sale of tickets that a larger crowd will be in attendance than ever before.  Izzy Cervones’s Jazz Orchestra will furnish the music.”
  • 1/7:  “The Young Men’s Hebrew Association of this place is arranging a smoker and entertainment to be given here on January 12 in the Y.M.H.A. rooms.  Jacob Fogel has charge of the entertainment as is conjunction with the rest of the committee to make the evening a success.  A more complete report of the affair will be published in the Messenger later.”
  • 1/9:  “To confirm with the jubilant spirit of the post bellum period a group of Y.M.H.A. members will present a minstrel show Monday evening in connection with a smoker at the club rooms in the Savings Bank & Trust Company building…” A long article, below, details the roles of Jerry Davidson, Jake Fogel, Bob Hilk, and Izzy Lasday.  “These boys imitate the Negro characteristics as in the days of minstrel success.”
  • 1/13:  “An enjoyable musical was rendered by Y.M.H.A. members last night…The frolic was immensely pleasing and the large attendance applauded appreciatively the many specialties” performed by Meyer Feinberg, Jake Fogel, Bob Hilk, Charles Fogel, Victor Averbach, Willie Numerosky, Sam Markowitz, Morris Margolis, Martin Hepps, and Dave PearlmanJerry Davidson directed and Isadore Lasday did the musical arrangements.  Full details below.
  • 1/13:  “The Hebrew Young Women’s Hebrew Association will celebrate their ninth anniversary Wednesday, Ja. 14, with a theatre party at the Alvin and luncheon.  The club has today a membership of 30 fine young ladies, and during its existence of nine years has accomplished much work.  The officers of the organization now are Miss Elizabeth Hepps, president; Miss Mollie Markowitz, vice president; Miss Rose Glick, secretary, and Miss Regina Haupt, treasurer.  Recently the Y.W.H.A. gave a bazaar for the benefit of the Sunday school, making it a huge financial success.  The club gave a dance at the Elks’ Temple Armistice Day and are anticipating holding another in the near future.”
  • 1/20:  “Two matches materialized in the Y.M.H.A. pocket billiard tournament in the club rooms last night.  In the first match, Harry Margolis, after trailing his opponent, Abe Averbach, at 32 to 17, came from behind and won 50 to 40.  The play in this contest was erratic at stages.  The second match was featured by brilliant runs for Shep Swede who defeated Doc. J. Moss 50 to 25.  Additional matches are scheduled the entire week.”
  • 1/24:  “At a meeting of the Dance committee recently arrangements were completed for the second informal winter dance to be held by the Y.M.H.A. of Homestead.  The affair will be staged in the beautiful ball room of the Elks Temple, on Tuesday evening, January 27.  Indication from report of sales of tickets are that a large number will be in attendance and many couples from along the Monongahela Valley will be present. The committee in charge is in hopes of making this one of the most successful events of the season.  The committee consists of the following members:  J.M. Hepps, chairman; M.J. Siegel, Mr. A. Pearlman, Mr. M. Fineberg, Mr. William Numerofsky, and Mr. Charles Fogel.”
  • 2/4:  “Preparations are being made by the Social Committtee of the W.W.H.A. (sic) for a shower to be held in honor of their member, Miss Sadie Siegle, at the home of Miss Jeannette Friedlander.”
  • 2/14:  “NOTICE Y.M.H.A. members will meet at their roms at 1 p.m. Sunday Feb. 15 to pay their last respects to their departed brother, Ben Mervis.”
  • 3/2:  “A shower was given Sunday evening by the members of the Y.W.H.A. of Homestead at the home of the Misses Jean and Gertrude Freedlander (sic), of Eleventh avenue, Homestead, in honor of a bride-elect, Miss Sadie Seigel, who will become the bride of Max Stahl, of Warren, Pa. in the spring.  The table decorations were red, white and blue, favors and appointments of George Washington.  Miss Seigel was presented with a beautiful table lamp by the members of the association.  Miss Dorothy Gordon, of Pittsburg, and Miss Rebeca Goldfarb were visiting guests.”
  • 3/5:  “The Homestead Young Women’s Hebrew Association are completing plans for their second Winter Dance which will be held at the Elks’ Temple Tuesday evening, March, 16.  Izzy Cervonne’s Orchestra, one of the jazziest around this territory, will furnish the music.  The following are in charge of the affair:  Miss Ruth J. Grinberg, chairman; the Misses Esther Widom, Jeannette Friedlander, Florence Goldston, Regina Haupt and Elizabeth Hepps.  A very enjoyable evening is assured all those who attend.”
  • 3/16:  “The Y.W.H.A. will hold a dance this evening in the Elks Temple.  A large crowd is expected and a large number of out of town people will attend.  An exceptionally large number of tickets have been sold and a most delightful time is in store.  The committee in charge is Miss Ruth Grinberg, chairman; Miss Fredlander (sic), Miss Esther Widom, Miss Florence Goldston, Miss Regina Haupt, and Miss Elizabeth Hepps.  Cervonnes Orchestra will furnish the music which will be a feature of the evening.”
  • 3/25:  “The public is invited to attend a literary meeting to be conducted by the Y.M.H.A. of Homestead, Friday evening, March 26, 1920, at the Club rooms Homestead Savings Bank building at 8:00 o’clock sharp.  Mr. Teller, of the Irene Kaufman Settlement, will be in charge of the meeting and an open discussion will take place.  Those in charge urge all who can attend to be present as upon you depends whether or not more meeting of this nature will be held in the future.  J.M. HEPPS
  • 7/27:  “The Y.M.H.A. of Homestead will hod their mid-summer Dansante at Homestead Park tomorrow evening.  A delightful time has been arranged for by the committee and everybody who attends is assured a good time.  The Strollers orchestra will furnish the music for the evening.  Dancing from 8:30 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.”


Community:  Boy Scouts Troop 2

  • 1/3:  “The first anniversary of Troop 2 will be celebrated Sunday evening at the Synagogue on Tenth avenue and McClure street.  This troop is one of the youngest organizations of its kind in the community.  It has started small but as you all know is very large now. The boys feel very happy to know that they are able to celebrate their first annual affair.  Many troops have started in Homestead but many of them have failed a very short time after they organized.  Troop 2 has down itself worthy as a troop in this respect.  Next Sunday evening the history of the troop will be read, also the different awards which it has received.  A very delightful evening will be spent.  Speakers of great note will be present.  All the scout officials are to be present, also all the parents of both boy scouts of Troop No. 2 and girls of Troop No. 7, and other Jewish parents of Homestead.”
  • 1/3:  “Much interest in Scoutdom is being manifested in the First Anniversary of the local Troop 2, comprising the Jewish youth of the community.  The celebration is to be held at the Synagogue, Tenth avenue, tomorrow evening.  Members of Troop 2 have established an envitable (sic) reputation for themselves under the able guidance of Assistant Scoutmaster Edward A. Haupt.  The Troop 2 flourished during the past year with much enthusiasm and vigor which materialized into a fine reality in winning the cet (sic) at the Homestead District Boy Scout Annual Round-up recently.  A fine program has been arranged including talks by leaders of the scout movement in Homestead by members of the troop and troop committee and presentation of merit badges to the scouts.  Many of Homestead’s leading citizens are expected to be present.  The public is cordially invited.”
  • 1/13:  “No news was published last week on account of the loss of one of its members, Maurice Hepps.  The whole troop was in mourning during the last week.  He was one of the charter members and a first class scout.  His career was a scout was one of the best in Homestead.”  The article went on to describe the first anniversary event on January 4.  Scribe Bernard Grinberg read the history of the troop.  Senior patrol leader Harry Feinstein read the list of awards.  Assistant Scoutmaster Ed. A. Haupt awarded the charter members a one-year service badge.  Isadore Numerosky gave Mr. Haupt a present.  The troop presented a minstrel under the direction of Mr. L. Metz.  The cast included Allan Widom, Bernard Grinberg, Jack Mervis, Harry Widom, Arthur Glick, Alex Rosenthal, and Nathan Rosenthal.
  • 1/16:  “All members of this troop are urgently requested to report for usual meeting tonight in troop rooms, Carnegie Library, at 7:30 o’clock.  Meet at H.L. Little‘s Shoe store at 7:15 o’clock sharp.  Important business will be transacted and more instructors appointed.  Meeting in charge of Scoutmaster Harry D. Margolis and Assistant Scoutmaster Jacob Hepps.  Let’s go!  Fall in!  Forward Ho”
  • 1/22:  “Troop No. 2 held a very important meeting last Friday evening.  Many important subjects were discussed.  The troop has very many prospects for the future.”  The speakers came from the district’s scout council.  Afterwards, “The boys started to play a few games.  An inter-patrol league was organized.  Each patrol meets every patrol in the troop to be play games.  To do signaling and first aid.”
  • 1/28:  “The Eagle Patrol of Troop No. 2 will hold a special meeting this evening at 7:15 o’clock sharp at their regular meeting rooms.  All members are urged to attend.  Many important things will be talked over and it is therefore necessary for every one to be present.  Do not fail to be there.  Signed GREEN and BLACK.”
  • 2/10:  “The Eagle Patrol of Troop No. 2 held a party Friday, Feb. 6, 1920 in rooms D, E and F at the Library…” The evening, described in this article, included remarks by Patrol Leader Samuel Jacobson and assistant Patrol leader Sidney Schwartz, a smelling contest won by Nathan Rosenthal, and Oscar Freedman playing the drum.  Mr. Haupt presided.
  • 2/11:  At the Homestead District Court of Honor, Boy Scouts of America, a merit badge was awarded to Martin W. Hepps for Life Saving, and Jack Mervis and Jacob Carpe were promoted to Second Class Scouts.
  • 2/12:  “The first swimming meet of the local Boy Scouts was held last evening at Carnegie Library swimming pool and proved a big success.”  Troop 2 came in third with 17 points.  S. Hepps came in fourth on the back dive, Troop 2 won the life saving competition and placed third in the relay race.  “One of the novelties of the meet was the obstacle race.  The scouts competing for this event brought an old suit of clothes which was placed at one end of the pool, the scout swamp one length of the pool and put on the clothes, then swam back to the starting point with the clothes on.  It proved to be a humorous affair and was captured by Samuel Hepps of Troop No. 2.” H. Hepps came in third and M. Hepps in fourth.
  • 2/24:  “The Eagle Patrol of Troop No. 2 will hold a meeting this evening at the regular meeting rooms.  Everyone is urged to attend as important things will be talked about.  Let us see if we can have all our members present this evening.  (Signed) GREEN & BLACK”
  • 2/24:  “The Troop Two basketball team wish to arrange games with all troops teams in Homestead.  The team is rather later in organizing but in what time is left they will make a reputation for themselves as they have done in other things.  For games call 535-W P & A phone and ask for Allan Widam Troops 1, 7, 10 and 11 take notice.  All games must be abroad.  Games are also wanted for the second team and second teams or patrol teams of other troops please take notice.”
  • 3/6:  “Troop No. 2’s second team will clash with Troop No. 13, cage men in a game of basketball at the Sokol hall, this evening at 7 p.m.  The following players report in front of Hepps at 6:15 this evening:  S. M. and H. Hepps, I. Saron, I. Shermer, N. Rosenthal, N. Lefkowitz and Ralph MarkowitzH. HEPPS, Manager.”
  • 3/8:  “Troop No. 2 seconds defeated the strong Troop No. 13 team Saturday evening by the score of 23-14.”  Full stats in the article about how I. Shermer, M. Hepps, I. Sarons, H. Hepps, S. Hepps, Markowitz, and Rosenthal played.
  • 3/11:  “The Wildcat Patrol had a meeting last night at the synagogue.  The elections were a source of excitement to the boys as many were nominated for patrol leader.  The nominations were limited to two, those being Harry Wolk and Harold Grossman.  Harry Wolk won by a large majority, Harold accepting his defeat in a scout’s spirit.  Isador Numerosky was elected assistant and Leonard Grinberg as scribe.  All boys report at Harold Grossman’s next Thursday evening at 7:30 sharp.”
  • 3/12:  “Troop No. 2 will hold a regular meeting at the Library at 7:30 o’clock this evening in Room A.  There is some very important business to transact.  Mrs. (sic?!) Haupt requests that all be present.  M.W. HEPPS, Asst. Scribe.”  Edward A. Haupt, Asst. Scoutmaster Troop 2, invited “the Boy Scouts of the Homestead district to a Saturday afternoon hike departing at 2 PM from the library “to some seven mile distant point.”
  • 3/13:  “Troop No. 2 held a regular meeting at the Carnegie Library, last evening.  The meeting was opened by Mr. Haupt by having the boys fall in and then count off.  There were twenty-four Scouts present.  Many important matters were decided upon, and it was decided to buy a window in the Synagogue for Maurice Hepps, Ray Grinberg and Charles Hertz.  This motion was carried unanimously.”  The rest of the article was lighter in tone, joking about the “Honorable Sam Hepps” who must be “coaxed” to meetings.  “Dues were collected by Sam Jacobson.  The meeting adjourned at 9 o’clock.  M.W. HEPPS, Asst. Scribe.”  Maurice Hepps, my great-uncle, died of appendicitis on January 5, just shy of his 13th birthday.  Rachel Grinberg died at 13 years on February 10 of pneumonia and influenza.  Charles Hertz died at age 10 on February 11 of nephritis.
  • 3/16:  “The members of the Stork Patrol of Troop 2 will hold a meeting this evening at 7 o’clock at the regular meeting place.  All members of this patrol are requested to be present for important matters are to be discussed.  I. SCHERMER, P.L.”  “The Panther Patrol of Troop 2 will hold a meeting this evening at the Assistant Patrol Leader, Allan Widom‘s home, 319 Seventh avenue.  All members are urged to be present as very important matters will be discussed.  By order of B.J. GRINBERG, Patrol Leader  J. MERVIS, Scribe.”
  • 3/17:  “The Eagle Patrol of Troop No. 2 held a meeting Tuesday, Mar. 16, at which all the members were present.  Roll was first called and dues were then collected showing in the treasury a pretty fair amount.  Important matters were then discussed.  We had a very popular visitor, Martin Hepps.”
  • 3/20:  “The Wild Cat patrol held a very important meeting Thursday night, opened by Harry Wolk, Patrol leader.  Many important questions were discussed including that of our hike.  We decided to walk to the Carnegie Museum, starting in the early morning and coming home at about 8:30.  It will be held in the very near future.  We had a very respectable visitor, Mr. Samuel Magram, who gave us a few points of ‘real scouting.’  After that we had a half an hour of scouting.  We played a few games, some of which, were buck, buck, Uncle Sam, fruit basket and man others.  Scribe.”
  • 3/23:  “The Stork Patrol of Troop 2 will hold a meeting this evening at 7 o’clock sharp at the regular meeting place.  All members of this patrol are requested to be present for important matters are to be discussed.  By I. Schermer, P.L.”
  • 3/30:  “There will be a meeting of the Stork Patrol, Troop 2, at their meeting rooms tonight at 7:30.  Scribe”
  • 3/30:  “Troop No. 2 Boy Scouts and Troop No. 7 Girl Scouts had a get-to-gether Sunday evening at the Synagogue.  There were sixty-five scouts present and four officers.”  The article lists the program and the activities of the evening.
  • 4/1:  “Troop No. 2 will hold a regular meeting Thursday evening at the Synagogue on Tenth avenue at 7:30 sharp.  There is some great fun in for all the boys that will be at the meeting.  Refreshments will be served.  M.W. Hepps, Asst. Scribe.”
  • 4/6:  “STORK PATROL – The Stork Patrol, Troop 2, will hold a meeting tonight at 7 o’clock at their meeting rooms. All members please be present. Scribe.”
  • 4/7:  “All members of Troop No. 2 Basketball team will report at the Pennsylvania railroad station, Wednesday, to catch the 6:56 train for Pittsburgh.  Troop No. 2 will put forth their best efforts to defeat the strong Troop No. 12 team of Pittsburgh.”
  • 4/19:  “Troop No. 2 held a meeting Thursday evening at the synagogue on Tenth avenue,” began scribe M.W. Hepps‘ long notes.  As usual, Mr. Haupt ran the meeting.  Their four patrols, Eagle, Stork, Wildcat, and Panther, were each assigned to a district of the town to assist the Ladies Aid’s clothing drive.  Harry Feinstein was admitted, making exactly 50 members in the troop.  The troop was visited by Samuel Feinberg and Harry Miller, and players Widom, Saron, Margolis, D. Freman (sic) and Numerosky prepared for their game that evening.”
  • 4/27: “The Wildcat Patrol of Troop No. 2 will hold an important meeting this (Tuesday) evening at the home of Herbert Hepps. All members are requested to be present as important matters will be discussed, including the collection of old clothes. The meeting will be called to order at 7:30 sharp. Is. Numerosky, Asst. Patrol Leader.”
  • 4/27: “The Troop Two Midgets, a subordinate organization of the said troop, had an important meeting last Sunday morning in the synagogue. They voted to assist the scouts in the collection of old clothes. The boys have a number of reliable scouts to lead them and the club is growing in members each day. All Jewish boys under the age of 12 who wish to join, see Scout Samuel Hepps.”
  • 4/30:  “Troop No. 2 held a regular meeting Thursday evening at the Synagogue at 7:30, which was opened by having drills and later we were seated.”  Assistant Scribe M.W. Hepps detailed the business of the meeting, from buying a window in the synagogue and gathering old clothes for war sufferers, to reviewing the activities of patrols.  “Dues were collected by Samuel Jacobson.  The visit of the evening was Pete Lasday, our future assistant Scoutmaster.”
  • 5/1:  “Mr. Haupt calls a special meeting of the Patrol Leaders and their assistants for Sunday May 2 at the Synagogue at 2 p.m.  It is necessary that all patrol leaders be present because Mr. Haupt wishes to run the patrols on a new basis.  There will also be a meeting of the Eagle Patrol at their regular meeting place Tuesday evening at 7 sharp.  All members must be present as their Patrol Leader has some important information for them.  M.W. Hepps, Asst. Scribe”
  • 5/12/1920: Be a Scout, by E. Hepps

    5/12/1920: Be a Scout, by E. Hepps

    5/6:  “Troop No. 2 will hold a regular meeting this evening at the synagogue on Tenth avenue at 7:15 sharp.  Troop No. 2 is planning some big surprises for the near future and to accomplish this it is necessary that a full attendance be on hand.  The main object of this meeting is the election of officers.  The officers that are open are Senior Patrol Leader, Scribe, and Financial secretary.  An interesting account of the meeting will be found in the Messenger Friday evening.  M.M. (sic) Hepps, Asst. Scribe”

  • 6/21:  “Troop 2 held a regular meeting Thursday evening,” began M.W. Heppsnotes.  It was conducted by Mr. HauptSam W. Hepps, Sam Fineberg and Harry Lasday had received their commissions as Assistant Scoutmasters of the troop.  A committee of Leo and Daniel Schwartz, Allan Widom, and Isador Norosky (sic?) was appointed for a social meeting on 7/1.  The troop planned to publish a small paper.  The staff included Allan Widom, Elsie Hepps, Bernard Grinberg, Martin W. Hepps, Dorothy Miller, Samuel Jacobson, and Edward A. Haupt.  The house committee of Harry Finestein, Herbert Hepps, and Isador Shermer were keeping the room in order for practice for the upcoming scout tests.  Samuel Jacobson collected money for the troop picture.
  • 6/26:  “A handsome loving cup, a check and birthday cake was presented to Troop 11 of the Boy Scouts by Troop 2 at the Community Night entertainment given last evening in the West Homestead school building in honor of their second anniversary.  The presentation was made by Edward Haupt of Troop 2 in behalf of the Boy Scouts and was highly appreciated by Troop 11 of West Homestead…”
  • 7/6:  Thursday evening brought another Troop 2 meeting led by Mr. Haupt.  Amongst the events M.W. Hepps notee, “Thirty scouts of Troop No. 2 intend to go to camp at Camp Homestead, North Girard.”  While Mr. Haupt was at camp, Assistant Scoutmaster Sam Fineberg would take charge for the first two weeks, to be joined by fellow assistant Sam Hepps for the remainder of the time.  Full article here, including how Oscar Freedman “recited for the troop.”
  • 7/10:  “Troop 2 held a regular meeting Thursday night.  The meeting was president over by Assistant Scout master Samuel Hepps and Samuel Fineburg.  It was officially announced that the scout field meet that was to be held next Saturday was called off.  The scouts decided to hold an all day hike which will be completed at the next meeting Thursday night.  The camp rally this evening is at the Library and all scouts are requested to be there at 7:00 P.M.”
  • 7/16:  Thursday evening Assistant Scoutmaster Sam Fineberg led a meeting.  A hike was arranged for Sunday morning, and then a father-son hike was contemplated.  Many more fun activities, including “a talk on keeping a checking account and how to make out checks properly” in the full notes by M.W. Hepps.
  • 7/17:  “Troop No. 2 Boy Scouts will hold a hike tomorrow morning.  The hike will be in charge of Assistant Scout Master Sam Feinberg.  All those going are to bring a light lunch.  The scouts will meet at the Synagogue at seven A.M. and start from there.  A good time is assured all who come.”
  • 8/12:  At camp, Isadore Schermer attained the first class rating; Edward Haupt, Harry Feinstein, Herbert Hepps, and Samuel Hepps won merit badges in Civics; I. Schermer, Herbert Hepps, Harry Feinstein in First aid to animals; Harry Feinstein and Herbert Hepps in First aid; Herbert Hepps and Harry Feinstein in Firemanship; Samuel Hepps and Herbert Hepps in Personal health; Isadore Schermer in Swimming; and Herbert Hepps in Scholarship.
  • 8/16:  “Troop No. 2 of the Boy Scouts returned home at an early hour this morning, the boys coming in on the P. & L.E. excursion train which was late and did not arrive until nearly one thirty.  There were about thirty boys in the party and all report having the best time of their life while at the camp on Lake Erie.”
  • 8/19:  “The third party of Boy Scouts numbering thirty-seven arrived at Camp Homestead safely last Sunday.  They are a happy lot of real American boys and are enjoying all the outdoor sports etc.  The second party made a good record during their stat at Camp.  The following Scouts were advanced to First Class” Harold Grossman, Herman Magram, and Jacob Carpe.  “The following Scouts were advanced to Second Class:” Myer Freed, Sam Hepps, Abe Keizler, William Keizler, Sidney Markley, Leonard Miller (?), Isadore Saron, Albert Schwartz, Harold Schwartz, Daniel Schwartz, Albert Schermer, Loue WarshafskyEdward A. Haupt won a merit badge in camping.  Sam Magram won one in Civics.  Harry Feinstein and Isadore Schermer won ones in C–ing.  Isadore Schermer, Jack Mervis, Sam Magram, and Harold Grossman – First Aid.  Sam Magram and Isadore Numerosky – First Aid to Animals.  Jack Mervis, Sam Magram, Isadore Numerosky, Harold Grossman, Harry Feinstein – Public Health.  Harry Feinstein, Isadore Schermer, Jack Mervis, Sam Magram, Isadore Numerosky, Harold Grossman – Personal Hepps.  Sam Magram – Swimming.  The Camp Court of Honor consisted of chairman Arthur M. Grossman, E.A. Haupt, and three other men.
  • 9/2:  “Troop No. 2 will hold their regular meeting Thursday evening September 2.  Important business will be transacted.  Report at the Synagogue at 7:15 sharp.  M.W. Hepps, scribe.”
  • 9/3:  “Troop No. 2 held a regular meeting Thursday evening at the Synagogue on Tenth avenue, Assistant Scoutmasters Sam Fineberg, Sam Hepps, and Harry Lasday took charge of the meeting.  Mr. Fineberg presiding as chairman.”  The notes by M.W. Hepps detailed the fun meeting.
  • 9/30:  “Troop 2 and 7 will meet tomorrow night in the scout rooms in the Carnegie Library at 7:30 sharp.  All members are urged to be present as important business matters will be discussed.”
  • 10/8:  “Troop No. 2 will hold a regular meeting at the Carnegie Library at 7:30 p.m. this evening.  Mr Fineberg urges all scouts to be present and to wear their uniforms.  Mr. Lasday will be present to discuss the winter activities to the boys.  M.W. Hepps, Scribe.”
  • 10/29:  “Troop No. 2 will hold a regular meeting, Friday evening, October 29, 1920…Mr. Fineberg who is now in charge of the troop requires every scout of troop No. 2 to be present because there are many important questions to be discussed…”  Full notice by M.W. Hepps here.
  • 11/4:  The paper’s Scout Notes column noted that Troop 2 would meet that Friday at 8:30 PM. All troops would distribute literate for the Fourth Red Cross Roll Call on Saturday.
  • 12/22:  The Scout Notes mentioned a Thursday morning hike of Frick Woods for all scouts and a Friday evening meeting for Troop 2.

Community:  Girls Scouts Troop 7 (later Ray Grinberg Troop #4)

  • 1/9:  “The Troop 7 Girls Scouts held a meeting Wednesday evening, January 7, at 7:45 and nearly all members were present.  The scouts were busy as they are preparing for a tenderfoot examination to be given on Wednesday evening. January 14th by Miss WeissMr. Haupt, assistant scout master of Troop No. 2, Boy Scouts, spent a short part of the evening with the scouts.  After a full review of the test was gone over by Miss Weiss and the scouts the meeting was adjourned by singing the “Star Spangled Banner” and pledging allegiance to the flag.  All members urged to be present at the meeting Wednesday evening as the tenderfoot test will be taken by the scouts. Mollie Mervis, Scribe.”
  • 2/3:  “Girl Scouts, Troop 7, will meet on Wednesday evening, Feb. 4, at 7:30.  A special program is being arranged by Patrol and all members please be present.  Scribe.”
  • 2/3:  “A joint hike was held on Saturday last by Troop 2, Boy Scouts, and Troop 7, Girl Scouts.  It was the most successful hike ever held by either troop….52 boys and girl scouts were in line…”  A delightful article by Scribe B.J. Grinberg recounts all the details of the hike, including the leadership of Mr. Haupt and Misses Regina Haupt, Rose Glick, and Jeannette Friedlander.
  • 2/6:  “Wednesday evening the Girl Scouts held a very interesting meeting at the synagogue.  A program was decided upon for the Saturday entertainment at the Community House.  The Pine Patrol entertained with a series of recitations, songs and a short play entitled ‘Mr. Lincoln’s Courtesies to a Little Girl.’  Rachel Kvenberg and Sadie Freed and Lillian Adelsberg made up the cast of characters.  Several recitations were given by Anna Margolis and songs by Florence Miller and Rose Feldes.  The patrol then joined and sang same scout songs.  February 18 the Girl Scouts and the Boy Scouts of Troop 2 will hold a joint meeting Sunday afternoon.  The Scouts spent a very enjoyable time hiking.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe.”
  • 2/17:  “There will be a meeting of Girl Scouts, Troop 7, Wednesday evening at the Library.  Business of importance will be transacted and all scouts must be present. ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe.”
  • 2/20:  “Girl Scouts of Troop 7 held a very interesting meeting.  Sarah Follman, Senior patrol leader, conducted the meeting.  Miss Regina Haupt and Miss Esther Margolis were guests of the evening and assisted in making the evening a very enjoyable one.  After all business matters were transacted games were played.  The meeting adjourned at 9:30.  A special program is being arranged for next Wednesday.”
  • 2/24:  “Girl Scouts of Troop No. 7 will hold a joint meeting with the Scouts of Troop 2 Wednesday evening.  Patrol Two will entertain, and an enjoyable evening is expected.  ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe.”
  • 2/26:  “The Whipperwill patrol of Troop 7 entertained the entire Troop 7 on Wednesday evening at the weekly meeting of the scouts at the Carnegie Library the feature of the evening being the play given by the patrol entitled ‘Unjust Suspicion’ in which ever member of the patrol was represented.  Selma Goldstone recited a poem called ‘Be Polite.’  An enjoyable evening was spent.  There will be a meeting of the patrol on Sunday afternoon at the home of the patrol leader.  Every member of the patrol is urged to be present.  Frances Friedlander, Scribe.”
  • 3/10:  “Ray Grinberg Troop of Girl Scouts formerly of Homestead, will hold a meeting at the Library Wednesday evening.  Come prepared.  ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe.”  This item is worded oddly, but the troop re-named itself in memory of Rachel Grinberg, who died on February 10.
  • 3/12:  “Ray Grinberg Troop–Wednesday evening the Girl Scouts held a meeting at the Library.  The assistant Scoutmistresses Rose Glick, Esther Margolis and Elizabeth Hepps were present.  The Scouts anticipate holding a social meeting next week.  A Social committee has already been appointed to attend to the business affairs.  Miss Esther Margolis, chairlady; Sarah Freeman, Rose Sedley, Dorothy Miller, Anna Margolis and Mildred Fogel.  After the business meeting the girls played games and then the meeting adjourned.  ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe”
  • 3/16:  A difficult-to-read notice says something like, “The girl scouts of this troop will hold a meeting at the Library Wednesday evening.  The Pine Patrol has…very interesting program…Girl will please…ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe.”
  • 3/19:  “The Ray Grinberg Troop held a meeting at the Library Wednesday evening.  Mr. Haupt called the meeting to order and after a few remarks left the meeting in the hands of the Assistant Scoutmistresses Rose Glick, Ruth Grinberg and Esther Margolis.  After the business meeting the Pine Patrol entertained with an Irish play.  Some of the scouts entertained with songs and recitations, then the scouts danced and during the evening refreshments were served by the social committee.  An enjoyable evening was spent and the meeting was adjourned.  ELSIE HEPPS, Scribe”
  • 3/23:  “Ray Grinberg Troop–The Scouts of this troop will hold a regular meeting at the Library Wednesday evening.  The Whipporwill (sic) Patrol will entertain.  All scouts are invited to attend.”
  • 3/24:  “Girl Scouts Entertain–Members of Troops Nos. 2 and 7 had a get together at the home of Miss Elsie Hepps on Sunday afternoon.  Francis Friedlander, Ruth Nors (sic?) and Oscar Freman (sic?) flashed the camera.  Those present were Frances Friedlander, Sarah Freeman, Ruth Moss, Mollie Mervis, Elsie and Sadie Hepps, Ida Schermer and Ruth Hepps; Sidney Schwartz, Oscar Freeman, Sam Hepps, William Keizler, Martin Wm. Hepps and Mr. Hayt.  A very enjoyable afternoon was spent by all present.”
  • 3/30:  “Ray Grinberg Troop–Last evening the girl scouts of this troop and the boys of Troop 7 (sic) held a party at the synagogue.  Wednesday evening the girl scouts will hold a regular meeting at the library and it is very important that every girl should be present.”
  • 4/2:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts Wednesday evening held a regular meeting at the Library.  Miss Holland, Director of Girl Scouts for Allegheny County addressed the girls and talked about how the movement originated, and the worth and value of a scout.  The girls have decided to have a hike Sunday afternoon.  All girls desiring to go will please assemble at the synagogue Sunday afternoon at 12 30 p.m.”
  • 4/7:  “The Ray Grinberg Troop Girls Scouts did not have a hike Sunday afternoon on account of the rain, so it has been postponed.  Wednesday evening a regular meeting will be held.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe”
  • 4/9:  “The Scouts of the Ray Grinberg troop held their regular meeting at the synagogue Wednesday evening.  Scout Lieutenants Rose Glick and Gertrude Friedlander took charge of the meeting.  The evening was spent in singing scout songs and playing games.  Scribe Elsie Hepps.”
  • 4/16:  “The Ray Grinberg Troop of Girl Scouts held a meeting Wednesday evening at the Synagogue.”  Scribe Elsie Hepps wrote up longer notes than usual about the meeting, include the visit of Mr. Haupt and Mr. Grinstead from the district’s scout council.
  • 4/20:  “Ray Grinberg Troop of Girl Scouts will hold their regular meeting at the synagogue Wednesday evening, April 21, which will be one of great importance as the scout lieutenants desire to begin their line of work.  All the Girl Scouts should be present.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe”
  • 4/23: “Wednesday evening the Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts held their regular meeting at the synagogue.  Lieutenant Esther Margolis and Jennie Friedlander were present.  Mr.  Haupt and Miss Regina Haupt addressed the scouts and later Mr. Haupt gave the girls their tenderfoot test.  The lieutenants of the troop attended the Girl Scout Council party at the Hospitality House in Pittsburg.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe.”
  • 4/27:  “The Ray Grinberg Troop of Girl Scouts will hold a regular meeting Wednesday evening, April 28, at the synagogue.  The Scout lieutenants have begun their instruction and in order to become an efficient scout one must always be present at the meeting.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe.”
  • 5/1:  “Ray Grinberg troop of Girl Scouts held a meeting at the synagogue Wednesday evening.  Lieutenant Jennie Friedlander gave the girls a test.  After the test the scouts took part in some drilling and then the remainder of the evening was spent in playing games.  Thursday the girl scouts tagged for the Palestine Restoration Fund the meeting was well attended and full of pep.  Elsie Hepps, Scribe”
  • 5/10:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scout Troop will have a meeting on Wednesday evening, at the synagogue as usual.  Do not fail to bring your signal flags and bandages.  A glorious time is promised to all and every scout is urged to come.  Be there at 7:40 sharp.  Dorothy Miller, Scribe.”
  • 5/18:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts will have a regular meeting on Wednesday May 19, 1920 at the Synagogue.  A large attendance is expected. We will continue with the second class test and will take up matters of important.  Bring your bandages and your signal flags.  Be at the Synagogue at 7:40 sharp.  Dorothy Miller, Scribe.”
  • 5/25:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts had a meeting Wednesday with an usually small attendance.  Let’s go girls!  Come and be a regular at each meeting.  We sang a few scout songs for the coming hike which was spoken of.  Selma Goldston was elected as cheer leader and everyone is urged to contribute new ‘yells’ to her.  Many matters of importance were discussed and it was decided that a stag party will be held soon.  Dues were collected and meeting adjourned at 10:15.  Dorothy Miller, Scribe”
  • 5/29:  “A meeting was held Wednesday, May 26th by the Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts at the synagogue.  Mollie Mervis took charge of the meeting.  It was decided to postpone the next meeting until Thursday, June 3, because of the picnic on Wednesday.  If next week’s meeting will be a success we will bring visitors for the week after that.  Volunteers for the program were accepted and in it there will be songs, duets, solos and speeches.  Attendance was taken and every scout was present but one.  The girls practiced signalling (sic) and reviewed the points of the compass.  The meeting adjourned at 10 o’clock.  Dorothy Miller, Scribe.”
  • 6/2: “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts will hold their meeting Thursday, June 3, at seven-thirty, when their program for Wednesday, June ninth will be announced.  The meeting was changed from Wednesday to Thursday on account of the school picnic.”
  • 6/15:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop 4 (sic?) will have a meeting Wednesday, June 16.  We will continue with our second class test and every girl is urged to come.”
  • 6/26:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts, Troop 4 (sic?), had a meeting Wednesday evening, June 23.  Business matters were discussed and camping was spoken of.  We then practiced the Second Class test and hope to pass it soon.  Some games were played and the meeting adjourned at 10:00.  Dorothy Miller, Scribe.”
  • 7/3:  The troop had a social meeting on Wednesday, June 30, at 7:45.  Sara Freeman and Lena Mehalowitz gave recitations, and Bella Freed, Selma Goldston, Gertrude Friedlander, and Sara Freeman staged a mock trial!
  • 7/16:  “A short business meeting was held by the Ray Grinberg troop 4 of girl scouts.  All scouts who were present received their certificate from headquarter.  The scouts who were not present will get their certificates at the next meeting.  After business matters were discussed the meeting adjourned at an early hour.”
  • 8/14:  “The Ray Grinberg Troop 4 of the Girl Scouts held a business meeting Wednesday, August 11th.  The meeting opened at 8:30.  Plans for the Milk and Ice Fund were completed and donations from the scouts were taken.  The committee for this will report to the Lieuts. and tell of the activities.”
  • 8/25:  “The Ray Grinberg troop 4 of Girl Scouts will hold a meeting at the synagogue tonight.  All girls be present at this meeting because many topics will be discussed.  Be there at 7:30.
  • 9/9:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop No. 4, held a regular meeting at the synagogue Wednesday, Sept. 8th.  Election of officers was held and the scouts elected are as follows:  Secretary, Bella Freed; treasurer, Selma Goldston; senior patrol leader, Sarah Freeman.  Later the scouts were seated according to patrols and patrol news was discussed.  Then Mr. Haupt, assistant scout master, told us many interesting details of camp.  After all the business was transacted the meeting adjourned at 9:30.  J. Bella Freed, scribe.”
  • 9/23:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop 4 will have a social on Thursday, September 23, 1920, at the synagogue with the Soho Troop of Allegheny county.  There will be no scout meeting Wednesday but all the business will be transacted before the social begins.  Wednesday, September 15, election of officers was held.  Those elected are Secretary, Bella Freed; treasurer, Selma Goldstein (sic); senior patrol leader, Sara Freeman.  A new member has joined this troop.  Herminnie Gross has joined Troop 4 and is registered as a scout.  All the scouts of this troop are requested to be at the Synagogue at 7:30 tonight in uniform.”
  • 9/27:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop 4 will hold their regular meeting on Tuesday, September 28, 1920, at the Synagogue at 7.30.  All Girl Scouts are urged to be there because there will be cheering and signaling.  There will also be important matters to be discussed.  J. Bella Freed, Scribe.”
  • 10/6:  The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop Four are giving a social with the Soho troop of Alleheny (sic) county on Wednesday evening, Oct. 6th, at the library, at 7:30.  All scouts of this troop are urged to be present in uniform.”
  • 11/22:  “The Ray Grinberg Girl Scouts of Troop 4 will not have a meeting today.  The meeting has been postponed until next Monday, and then we shall have our regular meeting.  All scouts must be present at the next meeting.”
  • 11/17:  In an article about the history and present conditions of the Girl Scout movement of Allegheny county, Rabbi Samuel H. Goldenson of the Rodef Shalom Congregation (in Pittsburgh, not Homestead) was quoted at length endorsing the movement.  Mrs. Enoch Rauh was one of the deputy commissioners for the upcoming drive for Girl Scout Week.

Jewish Miscellanea

  • 1/30:  “For the second lecture of discussion of the Homestead District Open Forum at the Carnegie Library next Sunday afternoon.  Chairman F.E. Schuchman announces Mr. Sidney A. Teller, superintendent of the Irene Kaufman Settlement of Pittsburgh, as the lecturer of the day.  His subject will be ‘What Is 100 Per Cent Americanism’…Mr. Teller is a very able and forceful speaker and his position at the Irene Kaufman Settlement enables him to speak from the heart and soul of our more unfortunate brethren whose side of the controversy he will represent…”
  • 2/2:  “The Ladies Hebrew Beneficiary Society, of McKeesport, will hold their 20th Annual Select dance at the Masonic Temple, tomorrow evening.  There will be a large crowd and a fine time for all.  Dancing from 8:30 to 12:30 Kelly’s Orchestra.”
  • 2/16:  A fire in the home of Rabbi Louis Horvitz was reported in the Homestead paper.
2/17/1920: Thousands of Jews Risk Lives in Brave Effort to Reach Palestine

2/17/1920: Thousands of Jews Risk Lives in Brave Effort to Reach Palestine

2/19/1920: Holy Land to be Made Homeland For Millions Facing Death

2/19/1920: Holy Land to be Made Homeland For Millions Facing Death

  • 2/23:  “Several thousand persons attended the dedicatory exercises for the new addition to the Jewish Home for Babies, Pittsburg, yesterday afternoon.  Further exercises will be held today, also tomorrow and Wednesday.  The addition has been recently completed at a cost of $40,000.”
3/1/1920: American Medical Unit Introduces "Spotless Town" Idea in Holy Land

3/1/1920: American Medical Unit Introduces “Spotless Town” Idea in Holy Land

  • 3/3:  “The Y.W.H.A. of Duquesne will hold a dance Tuesday evening, March 8, in the Bank Hall in Duquesne. Music will be furnished by Maggio’s orchestra.”
  • 5/26:  An article with picture anticipated the appoint of the Rt. Hon. Hebert L. Samuel to become the British commissioner for Palestine.
  • 11/2:  The Y M H A of Duquesne will hold a benefit dance Thursday, November 4th, 1920 at the Bank Hall at Duquesne, Pa. All proceeds will go to Mrs. I. Korn. Music furnished by Merrill’s Bellhop Orchestra of Portland, Ohio. Admission $1.00 per couple. Dancing from 8:30 to 1:00.”
  • 12/1:  An article with a New York dateline reported, “A conference to discuss the widespread campaign of secret anti-Jewish propaganda in the United States was called by the American Jewish Committee.  This conference…authorized the issuance of a public statement in which the so-called ‘Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion’ now being circulated in large number by secret agencies are condemned as a forgery, and the charge that Bolshevism is part of a conspiracy of the Jews and Freemasons to secure world domination is denounced as a malicious invention…”  The rest of the article is here.
  • 12/10:  The paper published an editorial against “accusations so manifestly absurd, so inherent improbable” — that is, “the charge that bolshevism is a part of a world conspiracy of Jewish ‘elders’, financiers and political schemers to obtain despotic power.”  Apparently the impetus was a recent statement by the American Jewish Committee and the actions of Henry Ford.  Full editorial below.
  • 12/18:  Another editorial addressed how “Palestine, if present plans carry, is to be remade to meet the new demands upon it…A made to order state is to be erected with a fund of $125,000,000 which the Zionists hope to raise, and Palestine will become the twentieth century home of the Jewish race.”
  • 12/31:  A final editorial discussed how the current Governor of Palestine “who describes himself as the successor to Pontius Pilate…[refused] to permit the construction of tram lines to the Mount of Olives and to Bethlehem.”  The editorial approved, noting that “there is room outside the walls for all that is new.”

Advertisements

These merchants advertised in the paper this year.

  • Half Bros
  • Lasdusky’s
  • Friedlander’s
  • Ben Little
  • H.L. Little’s Shoe Store
  • Victor Shoe Co.
  • Morris Grinberg’s Department Store
  • Meyer I. Grinberg
  • Joseph Glick’s Meat and Grocery Market
  • Kahn’s Specialty Shop
  • Trau’s Bon Ton Store
  • The Nifty Shoppe
  • Faigen’s Meat Market
  • Mark Fischel
  • I.L. Miller
  • Davidson (following the trend, he had his own anniversary sale in October)
  • I.J. Goldston
  • Brasley
  • The General Store (H. Szeinbach, proprietor)
  • A. Lefkowitz Poultry Market
  • I. Grossman
  • New System Bakery (Louis Feldman, manager)
  • Sam Lewis
  • Joe Rabinowitz (roofing and repairs)
  • Fox’s Meat Market
  • Max Mallinger
  • E. Greenstein’s
  • Freed’s Cash Market
  • M. Solomon and Sons

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